83 items (page 1 of 3) (100 per page)

  • Unidentified

    05 Mar 2019-37.6,144.9Jeff Triplett

    On trunk of small Grey Box. About 25mm long.

    20190305_0018c

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    1. Wendy Moore  maybe Apiomorpha

      Reply • 18 Dec 2019

      • Jeff Triplett  I thought so too but none of them seem to have the warts.

        Reply • 20 Dec 2019

    2. Wendy Moore  "Big fleas have little fleas upon their backs to bite 'em, And little fleas have lesser fleas, and so, ad infinitum. .........." Maybe?

      Reply • 21 Dec 2019

    3. Wendy Moore  https://www.projectnoah.org/spottings/212936021 2nd image

      Reply • 21 Dec 2019

    4. Wendy Moore   smooth & textured e.g. apiomorpha ALA gallery

      Reply • 21 Dec 2019

    5. Jeff Triplett  Leuba explained that my Apiomorpha munita obs had male galls growing on female galls. Not sure what you mean by "smooth and textured"

      Reply • 30 Dec 2019

  • Unidentified

    17 Dec 2019-37.7,144.9Jeff Triplett

    Bud gall on mature Yellow Box. Could not find any others.

    20191217_0000c

  • Unidentified

    27 Oct 2019-37.6,144.9Jeff Triplett

    Galls on twigs of a grey box. The galls are about 4mm wide on twigs about 1mm wide, and light green underneath. There were several groups like the one shown on the same waist high sapling. The largest group about 100mm across. Most of the stunted leaves attached to the galled twigs had conical galls on the underside, about 1.5mm high (see third photo). These appear to be associated since they do not appear anywhere else on the sapling.

    20191027_0048c

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    1. Jeff Triplett  I wonder if there is any point posting gall photos on inaturalist? There is no way of grouping galls together and the only identification I could give for this post would be Insecta or Eucalyptus microcarpa.

      Reply • 16 Nov 2019

    2. Wendy Moore  I think it is a Coccoidea, Eriococcidae see https://www.projectnoah.org/spottings/14032552 and https://www.projectnoah.org/spottings/15211207

      Reply • 25 Nov 2019

      • Jeff Triplett  Thanks Wendy. I personally would not have picked it from the Hardy and Gullan paper since all the photos show individual galls, not joined up like this, with the possible exception of Tanyscelis megagibba but that is a pretty useless photo. I note that the project noah postings are all 7 years old. Knowledge does not seem to have improved much since then since there are no similar photos anywhere on the web under the name Tanyscelis at least. There is a project on inaturalist for australian scale insects, maybe I should post it there.

        Reply • 27 Nov 2019

  • Psyllidae spp. Jumping plant louse Lerp Insect

    13 Sep 2019-37.7,144.9Jeff Triplett

    The first photo shows some lerps and what I assume is a psylid nymph. Psylid nymphs except for the first stage crawlers should not normally be seen but I read that sometimes they move to a different location to feed, which would make sense since the leaf seems to be quite badly damaged. Other photos show what appear to be newly emerged adults on the same red gum sapling. I assume the orange ones (about 2mm long) are female and the tiny black ones (about 0.5mm) male, but this is just a guess they could be something completely different. There were masses of lerps on this sapling and most still had nymphs in them when the photos were taken

    20190913_0001_1st_c

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  • Unidentified

    13 Dec 2018-37.8,144.8Jeff Triplett

    Caterpillar about 1cm long on Desmodium varians. It does not appear to be Zizina labradus which is the only species I can find recorded that has Desmodium sp. as larval food plant.

    20181210_0103c

  • Geranium gardneri Rough Crane's-bill

    04 Dec 2018-37.8,144.8Jeff Triplett

    Matches all points of description in Flora of Victoria (online), except that sepals are 7mm long versus max 4mm in description. (Fine hairs on sepals are too small to see in photo, but were examined under microscope.) Have not examined taproot or seed. Measured several stems to 1.8m but they may be longer as I could not get to the base of the plant.

    20181204_0003c

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    1. David Francis  Perhaps Geranium solanderi? This has petals to over 7mm. Status of Geranium gardneri as a separate species to the highly variable solanderi yet to be resolved. (see VicFlora)

      Reply • 06 Dec 2018

      • Jeff Triplett  The description of solanderi says sepals to 5.5mm long. Which is still too short. I am not qualified to comment on whether gardneri should be a separate species or not, but as long as it is in FOV I think it is a better match for this specimen. One of the key differences is the shape of the taproot which I have not looked at since I don't have a collection permit. However gardneri is supposed to be rough to the touch unlike solanderi. Also solanderi is supposed to have petals of a uniform colour whereas in gardneri they grade to white in the centre. In my photo they appear to be purple rather than pink which they are supposed to be in both species, but this could be due to incorrect white balance - will have to have another look at the plant. A fourth difference between the species is the longer stems, 2m versus 50cm. Since there is no scale you cannot tell from the photo but the plant photographed is well over a metre across. I must admit I did not try to follow individual stems to see how long they are, will have to do this.

        Reply • 07 Dec 2018

        • David Francis  Ok, Jeff , you seem to be well on top of this. I find geraniums to be a difficult genus.

          Reply • 08 Dec 2018

          • Jeff Triplett  Difficult is putting it mildly. I have been trying to ID the ones at Woodlands Historic Park for years.

            Reply • 13 Dec 2018

  • Unidentified

    17 Nov 2018-37.7,144.3Jeff Triplett

    there were three of these shield bugs on a cotton fireweed. Less than 10mm long.

    20181116_012c

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    1. Kimberi Pullen  Oncocoris apicalis

      Reply • 25 Apr 2019

  • Uromycladium tepperianum

    17 Nov 2018-37.7,144.3Jeff Triplett

    rust gall on seed pod of Acacia mearnsii. See my previous post re Uromycladium name changes

    20181116_005c

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    1. Leuba Ridgway  Interesting to see them on a seed pod.

      Reply • 05 Dec 2018

  • Unidentified

    07 Oct 2018-37.6,144.9Jeff Triplett

    A larger case moth, about 17mm long, on a stem of the same Grey Box sapling as https://natureshare.org.au/observations/5bbc18a0ed2a89c10e0024d8

    5bbc198bed2a89280700010e

  • Unidentified

    07 Oct 2018-37.6,144.9Jeff Triplett

    Appears to be a case moth, about 10mm long. There were at least 5 on the leaves of a small Grey Box. Second photo is another individual lying down.

    5bbc18a2ed2a89280700010d

  • Paropsis atomaria Paropsisterna variicollis

    07 Oct 2018-37.6,144.9Jeff Triplett

    two of the most common species of leaf beetles on adjacent leaves of a Sugar Gum

    5bbc17b8ed2a891efe0000f0

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  • Ellipsidion australe Xerochrysum viscosum Shiny Everlasting Sticky Everlasting

    09 Oct 2018-37.6,144.9Jeff Triplett

    Very young Australian Cockroach nymph getting between the outer bracts of the unopened flower head. Ants do the same thing so there must be some food down there, although I don't know why there would be.

    5bbc1228ed2a89280700010c

  • Cadmus (Cadmus) crucicollis

    28 Sep 2018-37.6,144.9Jeff Triplett

    Less than 10mm long. On Eucalyptus camaldulensis leaf

    5baeeaf0ed2a891efe0000e5

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    1. David Francis  Matches Martin L's on BB - http://www.bowerbird.org.au/observations/69592

      Reply • 04 Oct 2018

  • Uromycladium tepperianum

    31 Jan 2017-38.1,145.2Jeff Triplett

    Gall caused by a rust fungus, about 10cm across, on a large Acacia Mearnsii. Update: Uromycladium tepperianum has been split into at least 16 different species each infecting a different range of Acacia species. The one on Acacia mearnsii is called Uromycladium murphyi. See "Diversity of gall-forming rusts (Uromycladium, Pucciniales) on Acacia in Australia" by C. Doungsa-ard et al, Persoonia vol. 40, 2018 pages 221–238.

    5b7b8c85ed2a89402b000090

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    1. David Francis  Hi Jeff, great to have you keeping ahead of the game! Split into 16 species - that's a lot! We usually wait until the new names appear in the ALA before updating. The ALA names are sourced from Ausfungi (MEL)

      Reply • 12 Sep 2018

  • Ichneumonidae spp. Ichneumon Wasp

    01 Aug 2018-37.6,144.9Jeff Triplett

    Wasp doing absolutely nothing on a small gum, probably a bit cold!

    5b77b057ed2a89402b000089

  • Unidentified

    12 Aug 2017-37.6,144.9Jeff Triplett

    More bud galls on Black Wattle. I have only seen this sort once. I think they might be caused by Asphondylia glabrigerminis. Species is described in P Kolesik, RJ Adair, G Eick (2010) "Six new species of Asphondylia (Diptera:Cecidomyiidae) damaging flower buds and fruit of Australian Acacia (Mimosaceae", Systematic Entomology 35:250–267. There are some poorly reproduced photos in Adair, R.J., Burgess, T., Serdani, M. and Barber, P. (2009) Fungal associations in Asphondylia (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae) galls from Australia and South Africa: implications for biological control of invasive acacias. Fungal Ecology, 2 (3). pp. 121-134.

    5b77acf5ed2a8928070000a0

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  • Dasineura rubiformis Black-wattle Flower-galling Midge

    12 Aug 2017-37.6,144.9Jeff Triplett

    More Dasineura rubiformis galls, together with immature ungalled seed pods. This colour is more common in the park

    5b77abc3ed2a891efe000097

  • Dasineura rubiformis Black-wattle Flower-galling Midge

    11 May 2017-37.6,144.9Jeff Triplett

    These are bud galls on Black Wattle, which I believe are caused by Dasineura rubiformis. The species is described in Kolesik, P., Adair, R.J., and Eick, G (2005) "Nine new species of Dasineura (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae) from flowers of Australian Acacia (Mimosaceae)", Systematic Entomology 30:454-479. You can find photos on the web from south africa and portugal since this species has been released for biological control of black wattle. It was found not to affect the growth of plantation trees, but drastically reduces seed production and therefore invasiveness. Species is fairly common in Woodlands Historic Park.

    5b77a86fed2a89280700009f

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    1. David Francis  I'll add the species to the database if you are confident of the species. I can also add the genus only if you want to play safe

      Reply • 19 Aug 2018

      • Jeff Triplett  I am not sure anything can be identified to "professional standard" from a photo but rubiformis seems to be the only one in the paper that matches. Adair did a pretty comprehensive search for galls on the invasive acacia so there are unlikely to be any undescribed species on A. mearnsii. I say call it rubiformis until one of the professionals sees it and contradicts!

        Reply • 20 Aug 2018

    2. David Francis  Sound thinking, Jeff. I'll add the species to the database when I get back to my desk later in the week.

      Reply • 20 Aug 2018

    3. David Francis  Dasineura rubiformis added to dataset.

      Reply • 26 Aug 2018

  • Apiomorpha urnalis Eucalyptus melliodora Yellow Box

    06 Apr 2018-37.6,144.9Jeff Triplett

    Female galls on Yellow Box. Counted at least 40 on a 2m high sapling. Almost all straight sided, just a few more bulbous. The longest was 20mm. Bulbous gall in the photo is 16mm long and about 6mm diameter.

    5b77a5f1ed2a89280700009e

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    1. Leuba Ridgway  Very nice Jeff !

      Reply • 27 Nov 2018

  • Chrysomelidae spp. Leaf Beetle Myoporum insulare Common Boobialla

    30 Nov 2017-37.6,144.9Jeff Triplett

    There were large numbers of these very small beetles on the Myoporum insulare on Providence Road adjacent to Woodlands Historic Park. (These were planted by the council and do not occur in the Park.) I believe the enlarged hind femur identifies it as a flea beetle, tribe Alticini, which narrows it down to one of 232 species according to AFD

    5b70d6aced2a89c6aa000084

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    1. Kimberi Pullen  Beetle: Arsipoda sp. suggested.

      Reply • 25 Apr 2019

  • Eucalyptus melliodora Yellow Box Eurymelops rubrovittata

    01 Aug 2018-37.6,144.9Jeff Triplett

    Colony of Red-line Gumtree Hoppers at the base of a ca. 7 year old Yellow Box (approx 10cm trunk diameter). There were also a few individuals and pairs dispersed on a low branch. There were no ants in attendance so it appears the bugs are not feeding, but they must be at least preparing to mate. The male in the second photo is holding onto the female with his middle legs while vibrating his front and backs legs, usually not touching the female. Many pairs in the main group were behaving in a similar way with varying degrees of contact. In one pair the male had his hind legs stationary but was stroking the "face" of the female with his front legs.

    5b626c13ed2a89c6aa000074

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  • Peziza spp.

    12 Jul 2018-37.6,144.9Jeff Triplett

    Fungus growing on small pieces of charcoal. Largest cups about 20mm across. Possibly Peziza species?

    5b552dd6ed2a891efe00005e

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    John Walter, Lorraine Phelan, and Cathy Powers starred this.

    1. John Walter  Certainly a Peziza species but determining which one is more difficult. P. tenacella appears on burnt ground and charcoal and is the right size, however it is violet coloured when young and ages to brown. These specimens should still be in the violet stage if they were that species. There are other species listed for burnt ground but they all retain a violet colouration. Another option is P. echinospora which is also found on burnt ground. This species appears in Fuhrer but is not listed on ALA. A check on the Australasian Virtual Herbarium shows that several collections have been made by reliable sources that list this name, (Genevieve Gates and Pam Catcheside). Dennis's British Cup Fungi describes many Peziza species including P. echinospora under a different name and advises it reaches 80mm diam but is "usually much smaller". Your image certainly has many similarities to this species but I think the safest name for now is Peziza spp.

      Reply • 23 Jul 2018

  • Acanthosomatidae spp. Parent Bug family

    06 Apr 2018-37.6,144.9Jeff Triplett

    Seems to be feeding on a Yellow Box leaf. After wading through 500+ Pentatomidae photos on Bowerbird the only match I could find was http://www.bowerbird.org.au/observations/88269. According to the post Acanthosomatidae differs from Pentatomidae in having 2 instead of 3 tarsal segments but I don't think you can see that in my crappy photo.

    5acaec1bed2a8929e7000083

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    1. David Francis  Looks to be a good match with the BB obs, identified by Tony D. I've added to the classification details. A good find - only the second "Parent bug" on NatureShare.

      Reply • 10 Apr 2018

  • Papilio anactus Dainty Swallowtail Dingy Swallowtail

    28 Mar 2018-37.6,144.9Jeff Triplett

    Larval food plants are in the citrus family and do not exist in the park. I have previously seen the species mating at the Gellibrand Hill summit, and I assume this one next to Providence Road was there for the same purpose. I may have seen one in exactly the same spot last year. Presumably it is the closest place to someones Lemon tree that matches the criteria for a mating site.

    5abdfbfced2a8929e7000063

  • Vanessa itea Australian Admiral Yellow Admiral

    28 Mar 2018-37.6,144.9Jeff Triplett

    In the vegie patch at the Woodlands Historic Park office. Larval food plants in the Urticaceae family - the only extant plant in the park is the weed Small Nettle. Not sure what was of interest in the vegie patch, don't think they are growing any nettles.

    5abdfae2ed2a89abdd00005f

  • Apiomorpha conica

    21 Mar 2018-37.6,144.9Jeff Triplett

    On the same plant as previous two posts in galls group. From information recieved, the gall on the left contains a male and the gall on the right contains a female.

    5abde659ed2a89abdd00005e

  • Unidentified

    21 Mar 2018-37.6,144.9Jeff Triplett

    Stem galls about 20mm long on a shrub-sized Manna Gum. For other galls on same plant see http://natureshare.org.au/observations/5ab30202ed2a896baf0061c6

    5ab3030bed2a8929e7000054

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    1. Leuba Ridgway  I like this one. Hope we get n ID.

      Reply • 30 Mar 2018

      • Jeff Triplett  Could this not be the female of Apiomorpha conica? I chose this photo because there were a pair of galls, some others on the same plant looked quite similar but were definately more ovoid. I will post another photo.

        Reply • 30 Mar 2018

  • Apiomorpha conica

    21 Mar 2018-37.6,144.9Jeff Triplett

    Leaf galls about 10mm long on a shrub-sized Manna Gum. There were lots of galls on this plant, of two different types. Will post a photo of the other type as a separate observation.

    5ab30206ed2a897fc8000049

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    1. Leuba Ridgway  Apiomorpha conica species id suggested

      Reply • 30 Mar 2018

      • LynCook  I agree with ID of galls of females.

        Reply • 28 May 2018

    2. Leuba Ridgway  These are male galls of the scale insect. Family Eriococcidae. Female galls are larger and ovoid -https://natureshare.org.au/observations?species=Apiomorpha+conica

      Reply • 30 Mar 2018

  • Unidentified

    21 Mar 2018-37.6,144.9Jeff Triplett

    These galls are on the same shrub-sized Yellow Box as my previous observation in the galls group. The old galls are still there but this new form of gall covers all new shoots.

    5ab30101ed2a89cf90000046

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    1. LynCook  The galls of females are a bit of a weird shape because they have an inquiline living in them: a galler galling the gall. Probably a wasp but could be a fly. There are some tubular galls of males on the galls of females.

      Reply • 28 May 2018

      • Jeff Triplett  I actually saw a wasp on one of these galls, Callibracon sp. I suspect. I did not have the camera with me but there is a similar wasp shown on a gall in a previous post in this group.

        Reply • 05 Jul 2018

      • Jeff Triplett  I had assumed the wasp was parasitizing the gall insect, perhaps the inquiline is a different species again.

        Reply • 05 Jul 2018

      • Jeff Triplett  I would love to know why the Apiomorpha love this little sapling so much when there are lots of apparently more healthy Yellow Box saplings around it that they don't touch. Very poor dispersal ability?

        Reply • 05 Jul 2018

  • Anthela varia Varied Anthelid

    21 Mar 2018-37.6,144.9Jeff Triplett

    There were 3 or 4 of these caterpillars on the same branch of a Eucalyptus viminalis. The largest about 40mm long.

    5ab2ff5aed2a897fc8000048

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    1. Cathy Powers  Jeff - I suggest this is the caterpillar of Anthela varia. Nice photo.

      Reply • 22 Mar 2018

    2. David Francis  Id updated

      Reply • 23 Mar 2018

    3. Jeff Triplett  Thanks Cathy. I thought the pattern of hairs looked familiar but I have not seen a photo with the yellow patches on the top (not that I really searched).

      Reply • 23 Mar 2018