8 items (100 per page)

  • Unidentified

    27 Oct 2019-37.6,144.9Jeff Triplett

    Galls on twigs of a grey box. The galls are about 4mm wide on twigs about 1mm wide, and light green underneath. There were several groups like the one shown on the same waist high sapling. The largest group about 100mm across. Most of the stunted leaves attached to the galled twigs had conical galls on the underside, about 1.5mm high (see third photo). These appear to be associated since they do not appear anywhere else on the sapling.

    20191027_0048c

    Star     Comment    

    1. Jeff Triplett  I wonder if there is any point posting gall photos on inaturalist? There is no way of grouping galls together and the only identification I could give for this post would be Insecta or Eucalyptus microcarpa.

      Reply • 16 Nov

    2. Wendy Moore  I think it is a Coccoidea, Eriococcidae see https://www.projectnoah.org/spottings/14032552 and https://www.projectnoah.org/spottings/15211207

      Reply • 25 Nov

      • Jeff Triplett  Thanks Wendy. I personally would not have picked it from the Hardy and Gullan paper since all the photos show individual galls, not joined up like this, with the possible exception of Tanyscelis megagibba but that is a pretty useless photo. I note that the project noah postings are all 7 years old. Knowledge does not seem to have improved much since then since there are no similar photos anywhere on the web under the name Tanyscelis at least. There is a project on inaturalist for australian scale insects, maybe I should post it there.

        Reply • 27 Nov

  • Unidentified

    18 Nov 2018-37.9,145.2Leuba Ridgway

    Solitary stalked outgrowths from stems of a eucalyptus tree ( species not known) about 25 mm long and about 5 mm at the thickest part. One of them had split outer layers and a definite pointy tip. This gall was parasitised. There were two similar but smaller galls on other branches but these had rounded tips. The galls were all dry.

    Splitgall

  • Apiomorpha conica

    21 Mar 2018-37.6,144.9Jeff Triplett

    On the same plant as previous two posts in galls group. From information recieved, the gall on the left contains a male and the gall on the right contains a female.

    5abde659ed2a89abdd00005e

  • Unidentified

    21 Mar 2018-37.6,144.9Jeff Triplett

    Stem galls about 20mm long on a shrub-sized Manna Gum. For other galls on same plant see http://natureshare.org.au/observations/5ab30202ed2a896baf0061c6

    5ab3030bed2a8929e7000054

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    1. Leuba Ridgway  I like this one. Hope we get n ID.

      Reply • 30 Mar 2018

      • Jeff Triplett  Could this not be the female of Apiomorpha conica? I chose this photo because there were a pair of galls, some others on the same plant looked quite similar but were definately more ovoid. I will post another photo.

        Reply • 30 Mar 2018

  • Apiomorpha conica

    21 Mar 2018-37.6,144.9Jeff Triplett

    Leaf galls about 10mm long on a shrub-sized Manna Gum. There were lots of galls on this plant, of two different types. Will post a photo of the other type as a separate observation.

    5ab30206ed2a897fc8000049

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    1. Leuba Ridgway  Apiomorpha conica species id suggested

      Reply • 30 Mar 2018

      • LynCook  I agree with ID of galls of females.

        Reply • 28 May 2018

    2. Leuba Ridgway  These are male galls of the scale insect. Family Eriococcidae. Female galls are larger and ovoid -https://natureshare.org.au/observations?species=Apiomorpha+conica

      Reply • 30 Mar 2018

  • Unidentified

    21 Mar 2018-37.6,144.9Jeff Triplett

    These galls are on the same shrub-sized Yellow Box as my previous observation in the galls group. The old galls are still there but this new form of gall covers all new shoots.

    5ab30101ed2a89cf90000046

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    1. LynCook  The galls of females are a bit of a weird shape because they have an inquiline living in them: a galler galling the gall. Probably a wasp but could be a fly. There are some tubular galls of males on the galls of females.

      Reply • 28 May 2018

      • Jeff Triplett  I actually saw a wasp on one of these galls, Callibracon sp. I suspect. I did not have the camera with me but there is a similar wasp shown on a gall in a previous post in this group.

        Reply • 05 Jul 2018

      • Jeff Triplett  I had assumed the wasp was parasitizing the gall insect, perhaps the inquiline is a different species again.

        Reply • 05 Jul 2018

      • Jeff Triplett  I would love to know why the Apiomorpha love this little sapling so much when there are lots of apparently more healthy Yellow Box saplings around it that they don't touch. Very poor dispersal ability?

        Reply • 05 Jul 2018

  • Apiomorpha frenchi

    22 Jul 2017-33.9,148.0Leuba Ridgway

    An almost cylindrical gall with a slightly broader base (point of attachment to the stem). The gall appeared woody with a rough exterior. A drier gall seen on the same tree appeared to have annular splits. The apical end of the gall had rounded edges with a depressed centre and perfectly circular hole. Spotted on ? Eucalyptus blakelyi (Blakely's red gum) in the Weddin Mountains National Park, NSW.

    597e8a70ed2a893984000156

    Star     Comment    

    1. David Francis  Apiomorpha frenchi added to database

      Reply • 31 Jul 2017

      • Leuba Ridgway  Thank you David. Sorry I couldn't respond earlier.

        Reply • 28 Aug 2017

  • Unidentified

    04 Mar 2017-36.8,144.4Andrew Brown

    Unusual mushroom shaped galls? on a young eucalypt branch.

    58bb8683ed2a89e548000025