Under Maintenance This site is temporarily in READ-ONLY mode while under maintenance. For updates please follow @NatureShare on Twitter or the NatureShare channel on Telegram.


316 items (page 1 of 11) (100 per page)

  • Battarrea stevenii

    21 Jan 2006zeke1944

    5b8b5656ed2a89402b0000b2

    Star     Comment    

    1. zeke1944  Battarrea stevenii species id suggested

      Reply • 02 Sep

    2. zeke1944  Mallee Drumstick. Found throughout arid Australia. Image from Airport woodland near Bulla Victoria. Occasionally found in woodland with Boxthorns and Coastal areas around Melbourne.

      Reply • 17 Sep

  • Cymatoplex spp.

    21 Mar 2018-37.2,144.3John Walter

    Two images Cymatoplex sp. 1

    5b81dd92ed2a89c6aa0000a4

    Star     Comment    

    Cathy Powers starred this.

  • Aleurina ferruginea

    20 Aug 2018-37.6,144.1Ben Fisher

    5b7d6914ed2a8928070000b1

    Star     Comment    

    1. John Walter  Aleurina ferruginea species id suggested

      Reply • 23 Aug

  • Laccocephalum sclerotinium

    21 Jan 2006-38.5,144.0zeke1944

    5b7d530fed2a89c6aa00009b

    Star     Comment    

    1. zeke1944   Laccocephalum sclerotinum. A fairly common species after fire Cap to about 40cm. It has a long thin sclerotium

      Reply • 22 Aug

    2. Chris Lindorff  Laccocephalum sclerotinium added to database.

      Reply • 23 Aug

  • Laccocephalum tumulosum

    20 Jun 2014-38.5,143.9zeke1944

    5b7d4e98ed2a89402b000098

    Star     Comment    

    1. zeke1944  Laccocephalum tumulosum. The Stonemaker form a pseudosclerotia underground and fruits after fire. Found conveniently washed out in a roadside gutter. The Sclerotia was about the size of a cricket ball and the cap about 50mm diam.

      Reply • 22 Aug

    2. zeke1944  ID by the Herbarium

      Reply • 23 Aug

    3. Chris Lindorff  Added to database.

      Reply • 23 Aug

  • Flaviporus brownii

    15 Jun 2015-38.6,143.6zeke1944

    5b7cfe72ed2a89c6aa000097

    Star     Comment    

    1. zeke1944  Flaviporus brownii. A bright polypore. No clues from the data base.

      Reply • 22 Aug

    2. Cathy Powers  Flaviporus brownii added to dataset.

      Reply • 23 Aug

    3. John Walter  There is only one collection of this species listed for Australia on the Virtual Herbarium, although there are several for New Zealand. There have been a number of recent observations recently and I suspect the FNCV group has made more collections that have not yet been listed. Records overseas are for tropical Central and South America. The bright colour aids identification.

      Reply • 27 Aug

    4. zeke1944  Seen several times in the Powelltown/Noojee area can cover large areas on fallen logs. Seen once in the Otways.

      Reply • 27 Aug

  • Entolomataceae spp.

    01 Jun 2016-38.5,143.9zeke1944

    5b7cf943ed2a8928070000a9

    Star     Comment    

    1. zeke1944  This may be another fan shaped Entoloma the Mycelium is similar to that of E piterika and the cap has purplish hues and the spore seems to be pinkish. I know there is at least one more fan shaped species in the Entoloma genus I just don't know anything about it.

      Reply • 23 Aug

    2. John Walter  I guess you are referring to E. byssisedum which has been collected twice in Perth (once near pines) and in rainforest at the Bunya Mountains in Qld, plus there are two collections from the North Island in NZ one of which was from Nothofagus forest. This European species is the type species for the group E. pitereka is linked too. I have not spent long chasing images for it but it could be a possibility although it is more olive or brown toned rather than purplish and the basal mycelium seems to be more cobwebby.

      Reply • 26 Aug

    3. John Walter  I have also been looking closely at another fan shaped Clitopilus, C. conchatus. Gates & Ratkowsky does not provide a lot of data but Noordeloos & Gates has better detail. Some of your group appear too large for this species as it is listed as 5-6 mm diameter and the gills on this one are thicker than what I can see on yours. It does have "white, cottony rhizomorphs" like yours and the cap colour is described as "white, tomentose with a soft jelly-like greyish context revealed upon the collapse of the ... tomentum with handling". I do not this it is your species but I think we could record yours as Entolomataceae spp.

      Reply • 26 Aug

    4. Chris Lindorff  Entoloma pitereka has been added to database.

      Reply • 27 Aug

  • Entoloma albidosimulans

    25 May 2015-38.6,143.8zeke1944

    5b7bfd43ed2a891efe0000a4

    Star     Comment    

    1. zeke1944  Entoloma albidosimulans. Gates p64. Often on trunks of Dicksonia antartica.

      Reply • 21 Aug

    2. John Walter  There are two all white collybioid Entolomas currently described for Tasmania (Plus 3 that are tricholomatoid in shape). They are E. albidosimulans and E. totialbum. They are readily separated microscopically however I assume we only have this image to work on. E. albidosimulans has a cap that has a "deflexed then straight margin" and is "finely tomentose all over, becoming radially fibrillose with age" and undergoes a colour change when older to "pale ochre yellow to pink". The E. totialbum cap has a "straight, entire margin" and is "white becoming pink-tinged, glabrous, dry, slightly aeriferous".

      Reply • 22 Aug

    3. John Walter  The pink on the lower cap is spores deposited from above but there does appear to be a hint of yellowing at its left apex. It is difficult to determine if it has a finely tomentose surface. There is no hint of decurved margins in your image, even the small specimen in the inset appears to have straight margins and Gates images of E. albidosimulans this size clearly show an in-rolled margin. The gills of E. albidosimulans are described as "moderately distant" whereas on E. totialbum they are "crowded", and also described as having a serrulate edge. If you look closely at the gills in your post between 11 o clock and midday, you can see minute teeth or serrulations.

      Reply • 22 Aug

    4. John Walter  I am tending towards E. totialbum, largely on the serrulate gills, however even there, there is contradictory detail. E. albidosimulans can often have gills that are "distinctly emarginate with a distinct decurrent tooth" but they are otherwise adnate. The description for E. totialbum lists the gills as "adnate with decurrent tooth". The sharp dip in the gills as they approach the stipe is defined as emarginate and is apparent on this sample. Unfortunately there have been very few collections of E. totialbum so it is possible it might also show this feature. This could very easily be either species. One feature of E. totialbum that might help separate these is that it's stipe is slightly yellowing at the base. If you have other images of this group that show the base of the stipe it might help. I was introduced to E. albidosimulans by Genevieve Gates in the Tarkine a few years back, those specimens were older and rain affected but they were located on the trunk of Dicksonia antarctica. The text I have does not describe the substrates for either species unfortunately.

      Reply • 22 Aug

    5. John Walter  I just noted on the description for E. albidosimulans that the gill edges can be "slightly fimbriate" meaning lightly toothed. This now puts the weight of evidence back towards E. albidosimulans.

      Reply • 22 Aug

    6. zeke1944  There you go.

      Reply • 22 Aug

    7. Cathy Powers  Entoloma albidosimulans added to dataset.

      Reply • 23 Aug

  • Humidicutis arcohastata

    13 May 2011-38.6,143.8zeke1944

    5b7b9cc1ed2a891efe0000a2

    Star     Comment    

    1. zeke1944  Humidicutis arcohastata. This name may have been superceded again. Seen at Lake Elizabeth. Prone to color changes.

      Reply • 21 Aug

    2. Cathy Powers  Humidicutis arcohastata added to dataset.

      Reply • 24 Aug

  • Isaria spp.

    22 Jun 2012-38.3,144.1zeke1944

    5b7a41feed2a8928070000a7

    Star     Comment    

    1. zeke1944  Isaria sp. This name was given to us by the Her barium, Seen several times in the Anglesea area

      Reply • 20 Aug

    2. Cathy Powers  Isaria spp. added to dataset.

      Reply • 21 Aug

    3. John Walter  The Isaria are related to the Cordyceps

      Reply • 26 Aug

  • Phaeoclavulina abietina

    11 Jul 2012-38.4,144.3zeke1944

    5b7a361fed2a89c6aa000091

    Star     Comment    

    Bernie Lingham starred this.

    1. zeke1944  Ramaria abietina. Rare is Australia. Only found in 2 sites in Victoria.

      Reply • 20 Aug

    2. Cathy Powers  Phaeoclavulina abietina added to dataset. Ramaria abietina is a synonym.

      Reply • 21 Aug

  • Entoloma tomentosolilacinum

    15 May 2014-38.6,143.9zeke1944

    5b7965c8ed2a8928070000a4

    Star     Comment    

    1. zeke1944  Entoloma tomentosolilacium take 2

      Reply • 19 Aug

    2. John Walter  This set is closer to what I was expecting to see and the lower left image shows the silky fibrillose stipe and white basal tomentum. Gates gives the cap size as 5 - 15 diameter and the cap is described as lilac-grey to greyish ruby. The stipes look very dark in the upper image. One thing I have noticed after working through the images in The Entolomataceae of Tasmania, is that there is a lot of variation in colour with many species. The combination of the tomentose cap, fibrillose stipe, located on wood etc. all points to E. tomentosolilacinum. Could Entoloma tomentosolilacinum be added to the dataset please.

      Reply • 19 Aug

    3. Cathy Powers  Entoloma tomentosolilacinum added to dataset.

      Reply • 21 Aug

  • Entoloma uliginicola

    18 May 2017-38.7,143.4John Walter

    Four images. A more intense colour form than the earlier post.

    5b792172ed2a891efe00009f

  • Entoloma pitereka

    17 Jun 2017-38.5,144.1zeke1944

    5b78b958ed2a89402b00008c

    Star     Comment    

    1. zeke1944  Entoloma pitereka. Found at Moggs Crekk. Has a distinctive rhizomorph.

      Reply • 19 Aug

    2. John Walter  The white rhizomorphs spreading across the wood are characteristic of the species and readily separate this from the similar looking, and also pink-spored, Clitopilus hobsonii. Could Entoloma pitereka be added to the dataset.

      Reply • 19 Aug

  • Clitocybula sp. nov. sensu Gates & Ratkowsky(1) 2016 Streaky Yellow

    12 Apr 2014-37.4,144.3John Walter

    4 Images. This is Clitocybula sp. "Streaky Yellow", a little scruffy on top due to the heavy rain.

    5b77c0bfed2a891efe000098

  • Entoloma stramineopallescens

    24 Apr 2014-38.5,143.9zeke1944

    5b77a4ceed2a89c6aa00008a

    Star     Comment    

    1. zeke1944  Entoloma stramineopallescens Gates p78

      Reply • 18 Aug

    2. John Walter  Could Entoloma stramineopallescens be added to the dataset please.

      Reply • 19 Aug

    3. Cathy Powers  Entoloma stramineopallescens added to dataset.

      Reply • 21 Aug

  • Entoloma brevispermum

    22 May 2014-38.6,143.8zeke1944

    5b761b0ced2a89402b000087

    Star     Comment    

    1. zeke1944  Entoloma brevispermum Gates p67

      Reply • 17 Aug

    2. zeke1944  Entoloma spp. species id suggested

      Reply • 17 Aug

    3. John Walter  This is almost identical to an image of this species in Noordeloos & Gates, The Entolomataceae of Tasmania. Could Entoloma brevispermum be added to the database please.

      Reply • 18 Aug

    4. Cathy Powers  Entoloma brevispermum added to dataset.

      Reply • 21 Aug

  • Camarophyllopsis spp.

    18 Jul 2012-38.5,143.9zeke1944

    5b7d56a8ed2a891efe0000ac

    Star     Comment    

    1. zeke1944  Camarophyllus spp. species id suggested

      Reply • 17 Aug

    2. John Walter  I am not sure there is enough evidence to record it as Camarophyllopsis kearneyi. It clearly looks to be a Camarophyllopsis species, but the stipe seems too pale and we cannot see the full upper surface of the pileus to confirm the darker centre. Young describes the pileus margin as crenulate and shows it strongly so in his line drawing however his image in the same publication indicates this is not a constant feature. The correct genus is Camarophyllopsis, not Camarophyllus. Could Camarophyllopsis spp. be added to the database please.

      Reply • 18 Aug

    3. zeke1944  There is an image in one of Tony Young's books which looks a lot like this. Have posted another image of a more mature specimen

      Reply • 19 Aug

    4. Cathy Powers  Camarophyllopsis spp. added to dataset.

      Reply • 21 Aug

    5. zeke1944  The second image is from the Lake Elizabeth area and is a younger specimen

      Reply • 22 Aug

  • Clitocybula sp. nov. sensu Gates & Ratkowsky(1) 2016 Streaky Yellow

    29 Apr 2017-38.6,143.9zeke1944

    5b7530e4ed2a89280700009a

    Star     Comment    

    1. zeke1944  Clitocybula sp streaky yellow. Gates p41

      Reply • 16 Aug

    2. John Walter  I have also found this species in the Wombat in Blue Gully but have not posted it yet. It is quite distinctive with the two tone gills. Could Clitocybula sp. nov. sensu Gates & Ratkowsky(1) 2016 be added to the database please and include Streaky Yellow in the common name.

      Reply • 18 Aug

    3. Cathy Powers  Dataset updated with name and common name.

      Reply • 21 Aug

  • Hispidula dicksoniae

    14 Aug 2018-38.6,143.9zeke1944

    5b72446aed2a89402b000085

    Star     Comment    

    Lorraine Phelan starred this.

    1. zeke1944  Named as Hispidula dicksoniae in Fuhrer (485)

      Reply • 14 Aug

    2. David Francis  Hispidula dicksoniae added to dataset

      Reply • 14 Aug

  • Hygrocybe reesiae

    01 Jun 2016-38.5,143.9zeke1944

    5b724368ed2a891efe000094

    Star     Comment    

    1. David Francis  Hygrocybe reesiae added/corrected.

      Reply • 14 Aug

    2. zeke1944  Hygrocybe reesiae not in data base. Seen around Blanket leaf area a couple ot times.

      Reply • 18 Aug

    3. John Walter  Are both images from the same group?

      Reply • 18 Aug

    4. zeke1944  Yes there was quite a group.

      Reply • 19 Aug

    5. John Walter  I was a bit concerned by the pale base to the stipe and whether that indicated this was H. cheelii, however there is no indication of the pink tones of that species. Could Hygrocybe reesiae be added to the database please.

      Reply • 19 Aug

  • Hygrocybe aurantipes

    25 May 2015-38.6,143.8zeke1944

    5b7178aaed2a892807000098

    Star     Comment    

    1. zeke1944  Hygrocybe aurantipes. Name not listed

      Reply • 13 Aug

    2. David Francis  Hygrocybe aurantipes added to db.

      Reply • 14 Aug

  • Cortinarius austrocyanites

    20 Jun 2015-38.5,143.9zeke1944

    5b6e3cefed2a891efe00008f

    Star     Comment    

    John Walter starred this.

    1. zeke1944  Cortinarius austrocyanites gates p49

      Reply • 11 Aug

    2. David Francis  Cortinarius austrocyanites added to db.

      Reply • 14 Aug

  • Postia venata

    06 Jul 2012-37.4,144.6zeke1944

    5b6bc9bced2a891efe00008e

    Star     Comment    

    1. zeke1944  Postia venata small polypore seen once. Gates P192. best image Vol 1 P196

      Reply • 09 Aug

    2. David Francis  P. venata added to db.

      Reply • 14 Aug

  • Mycocalia spp.

    05 Aug 2018zeke1944

    5b682c78ed2a891efe00008c

    Star     Comment    

    1. zeke1944  Inset is at Anglesea. I'm not really sure about this one it certainly looked the same as the Anglesea specimen on the Computer. and it does show a hint of pink through the sack. I didn't ID it in the field. Its very tiny. Anyway here it is again.

      Reply • 06 Aug

    2. John Walter  If you click on the earlier post to open it you can use the edit details to add the image back to that record. I suggest you then delete this record so it is only on the system once

      Reply • 06 Aug

    3. John Walter  Mycocalia denudata has several records for Victoria and M. duriaeana has not been recorded. Unfortunately this genus was not listed in Cunningham's Gasteromycetes of Australia and New Zealand but both the species listed here are depicted in my most comprehensive British field guide. The former species has yellow brown peridioles while the latter has red brown peridioles. As the inset image is from a different location it does not assist with this identification. I think Mycocalia spp. is the safest option here.

      Reply • 19 Aug

      • zeke1944  I realise this the inset looks like duriaeana as was tracked down as such by I think Tom May. Its a pity I didn't realise what it was at the time. I am however getting my eyes fixed at the moment so next time I'll be able to see more clearly. Also while I'm at it what constitutes the Otways. The Anglesea Heath? the Beach at Aireys Inlet (some good stuff there) The Swamp at Anglesea ?. Forest Road and or Cecil track. Gherang Gherang Reserve ? If this are all included I could tickle this along for quite some time with a lot of unusual species. Cheers R

        Reply • 19 Aug

  • Ramaria spp.

    01 Jun 2014-37.5,144.3zeke1944

    5b62e593ed2a89c6aa00007b

    Star     Comment    

    1. zeke1944  Could well be Ramaria stunzii. Very small and it has been found in the Wombat Forest before.

      Reply • 02 Aug

    2. John Walter  This is the same specimen that was used to illustrate this species in the "Little Book of Corals", albeit taken from a different angle. In that publication it is listed as Ramaria stuntzii var. gelatinosa, an extremely rare species of which there are only two records, one from Olinda and one from the Wombat State Forest. Watling made these collections in 1982 and took to them back to Edinburgh where he names the variety in 1989. There are also two references to R. stuntzii, one is a specimen in Perth which was collected in USA, and the other is a recent sighting to the east of Melbourne. I would like to review this further and try and locate a copy of Watling's description. Young provides some information on the Qld Mycological Society site describing the stipe flesh as "white and distinctly gelatinous" and the apices as bright red. Index Fungorum has the comment "On soil or burnt over soil under Eucalyptus: Victoria"

      Reply • 02 Aug

    3. John Walter  What was the general location? Is that post burn debris next to it?

      Reply • 03 Aug

    4. zeke1944  I'd say so. It was a stone's throw from the Cortinarius canaria tree almost on the track. Lost the data again. Cheers R

      Reply • 03 Aug

    5. John Walter  Watlings original paper has eluded me however I now realise Young provided a more detailed description on the Qld site which includes colour photographs of the dried specimens collected by Watling. This is a good match in many ways although colour is a concern. The description of R. stuntzii var. stuntzii advises it is "scarlet" in youth, fading to "light orange-red" and Young's summary of var. gelatinosa states that form has pink to bright pink branches with bright red apices. Has this specimen faded to light orange-red? The image in the little corals publication shows some of the stipe and hints at the presence of strigose mycelium and white tomentum at the base which would conform with Young's notes but the image is not sharp enough in that area to be certain. The dried Wombat Forest specimen collected by Watling still shows strong pink tones. Perhaps this is Ramaria stuntzii var gelatinosa, and perhaps it is not. If it is not, then it also appears to not be any other Australian listed Ramaria species either. It is a big step to claim this as the only legitimate image of an in field specimen of Ramaria stuntzii var. gelatinosa without there being proper microscopic examination to back up the claim. I think it is best to list this as Ramaria spp. and put "possibly Ramaria stuntzii var. gelatinosa" in the the description field.

      Reply • 03 Aug

  • Cortinarius pseudorotundisporus

    15 May 2015-38.6,143.7John Walter

    Several images

    5b62bf00ed2a89c6aa00007a

  • Cortinarius pseudorotundisporus

    15 May 2016-37.4,144.3John Walter

    Several images

    5b62bfe8ed2a891efe000086

  • Cortinarius pseudorotundisporus

    17 May 2015-37.5,144.3zeke1944

    5b628fa3ed2a89c6aa000076

    Star     Comment    

    1. zeke1944  I think this Cortinarius pseudorotundisporus, Have found this far and wide in several locations. It is smaller than C rotundisporus and always retains an umbo it also has on occasions yellowish hues the proportion is different as well with a smaller cap for the length of the stem. Usually found in wet gullies in groups. Seen in the Jack Cann reserve.

      Reply • 02 Aug

    2. John Walter  Yes, I have seen the FNCV refer to this item under that name. I have found it in Blue Gully and also near Mt Sabine Falls in the Otways. I have a description for C. pseudorotundisporus in my files some where, will review it and let you know - just found the description in another of Gasparini's papers and it is an excellent match. He mentions the pileus margin is striate in his English description, but he makes no reference to this in the official Latin diagnosis. Your image and mine do not indicate this species is translucently striate and Gasparini did not use the word transluscent so perhaps he was referring to the way the fibrils give it a vaguely striate appearance. It certainly was not deemed important enough to include in the diagnosis. I suspect the colour is a bit too dark in your image going by the level of the shadow and green on the fern. Could Cortinarius pseudorotundisporus be added to the database please.

      Reply • 02 Aug

    3. David Francis  Cortinarius pseudorotundisporus added to dataset

      Reply • 02 Aug

  • Lentinellus castoreus

    01 Jul 2015-37.4,144.3zeke1944

    5b6262f0ed2a89c6aa000073

    Star     Comment    

    1. zeke1944  Lentinellis castoreus. On large Manna gum. Tongue shaped cat with close serrated gills. Not listed on ALA.

      Reply • 02 Aug

    2. John Walter  I agree with the ID, Lentinellus castoreus is listed on ALA but us not yet in our dataset. Could the dataset be updated please.

      Reply • 02 Aug

    3. Cathy Powers  Species added to dataset.

      Reply • 02 Aug