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122 items (page 3 of 5) (100 per page)

  • Entoloma spp.

    25 May 2015-38.5,143.7zeke1944

    5b7cf6c2ed2a8928070000a8

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    1. zeke1944  Entoloma haastii. About 4cm diam. Found in a bare rocky site near Forest.

      Reply • 22 Aug

    2. zeke1944   Also featured in Fuhrer (87) as Entoloma sp.

      Reply • 22 Aug

    3. John Walter  In ALA, could Entoloma haastii be added to the dataset please

      Reply • 26 Aug

    4. Chris Lindorff  Entoloma haastii added to database.

      Reply • 27 Aug

  • Entoloma spp.

    22 Aug 2018-38.5,143.7zeke1944

    5b7cf65fed2a89402b000092

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    1. zeke1944  Entoloma porphyrescens. Gates p75

      Reply • 22 Aug

    2. John Walter  This species in on ALA, could Entoloma porphyrescens be added to the dataset please

      Reply • 26 Aug

    3. Chris Lindorff  Entoloma porphyrescens added to database.

      Reply • 27 Aug

  • Entoloma albidosimulans

    25 May 2015-38.6,143.8zeke1944

    5b7bfd43ed2a891efe0000a4

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    1. zeke1944  Entoloma albidosimulans. Gates p64. Often on trunks of Dicksonia antartica.

      Reply • 21 Aug

    2. John Walter  There are two all white collybioid Entolomas currently described for Tasmania (Plus 3 that are tricholomatoid in shape). They are E. albidosimulans and E. totialbum. They are readily separated microscopically however I assume we only have this image to work on. E. albidosimulans has a cap that has a "deflexed then straight margin" and is "finely tomentose all over, becoming radially fibrillose with age" and undergoes a colour change when older to "pale ochre yellow to pink". The E. totialbum cap has a "straight, entire margin" and is "white becoming pink-tinged, glabrous, dry, slightly aeriferous".

      Reply • 22 Aug

    3. John Walter  The pink on the lower cap is spores deposited from above but there does appear to be a hint of yellowing at its left apex. It is difficult to determine if it has a finely tomentose surface. There is no hint of decurved margins in your image, even the small specimen in the inset appears to have straight margins and Gates images of E. albidosimulans this size clearly show an in-rolled margin. The gills of E. albidosimulans are described as "moderately distant" whereas on E. totialbum they are "crowded", and also described as having a serrulate edge. If you look closely at the gills in your post between 11 o clock and midday, you can see minute teeth or serrulations.

      Reply • 22 Aug

    4. John Walter  I am tending towards E. totialbum, largely on the serrulate gills, however even there, there is contradictory detail. E. albidosimulans can often have gills that are "distinctly emarginate with a distinct decurrent tooth" but they are otherwise adnate. The description for E. totialbum lists the gills as "adnate with decurrent tooth". The sharp dip in the gills as they approach the stipe is defined as emarginate and is apparent on this sample. Unfortunately there have been very few collections of E. totialbum so it is possible it might also show this feature. This could very easily be either species. One feature of E. totialbum that might help separate these is that it's stipe is slightly yellowing at the base. If you have other images of this group that show the base of the stipe it might help. I was introduced to E. albidosimulans by Genevieve Gates in the Tarkine a few years back, those specimens were older and rain affected but they were located on the trunk of Dicksonia antarctica. The text I have does not describe the substrates for either species unfortunately.

      Reply • 22 Aug

    5. John Walter  I just noted on the description for E. albidosimulans that the gill edges can be "slightly fimbriate" meaning lightly toothed. This now puts the weight of evidence back towards E. albidosimulans.

      Reply • 22 Aug

    6. zeke1944  There you go.

      Reply • 22 Aug

    7. Cathy Powers  Entoloma albidosimulans added to dataset.

      Reply • 23 Aug

  • Camarophyllopsis spp.

    18 Jul 2012-38.5,143.9zeke1944

    5b7ba3f5ed2a891efe0000a3

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    1. zeke1944  Camarophyllopsis spp. species id suggested

      Reply • 21 Aug

    2. zeke1944  Originally Id as Hygrotrama sp. This now appears now to be with Camerophyllopsis and may be featured in Gates p37 as C brown. Also seen in the Wombat Forest. Seems to like bare soil.

      Reply • 21 Aug

  • Mycena spp.

    05 Jun 2014-38.5,143.9zeke1944

    5b7ba170ed2a89c6aa000095

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    1. zeke1944  Mycena aff mamuka. Formerly known as Marasmius cylindraceocampanulatus. found on stem material that belongs to Dicksonia antartica. Close to the NZ species M mamuka which has a different gill formation.

      Reply • 21 Aug

    2. John Walter  Could this species be added in the same way we have done other such as Xylaria "Spikey". e.g. Mycena sp. nov. sensu Gates & Ratkowsky(1) 2016 / aff Mycena mamaku I have also found this species in the Otways on Wild Dog Rd and also on tree fern, unfortunately I had focus issues with the camera but you can see the gills are sometimes decurrent.

      Reply • 26 Aug

  • Humidicutis arcohastata

    13 May 2011-38.6,143.8zeke1944

    5b7b9cc1ed2a891efe0000a2

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    1. zeke1944  Humidicutis arcohastata. This name may have been superceded again. Seen at Lake Elizabeth. Prone to color changes.

      Reply • 21 Aug

    2. Cathy Powers  Humidicutis arcohastata added to dataset.

      Reply • 24 Aug

  • Aleurodiscus spp.

    15 Apr 2012-38.5,143.9zeke1944

    5b7b9744ed2a89c6aa000093

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    Cathy Powers starred this.

    1. zeke1944  Aleurodiscus spp. species id suggested

      Reply • 21 Aug

    2. zeke1944   Featured in Fuhrer 428. Found on dead Bracken fronds (Pteridium asculentum) in wetter forests. Seen only once.

      Reply • 21 Aug

  • Cordyceps spp.

    27 Mar 2016-38.5,143.9zeke1944

    5b7ab610ed2a891efe0000a1

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    1. zeke1944  his species is listed as Cordyceps taylorii in gates p219. However this species is also described as large to 30cm and not unlike C robertsii. Some dispute here. Specimen here 2 to 3 cm.

      Reply • 21 Aug

    2. John Walter  Agree, some dispute here. The Willis paper on Cordyceps from Muelleria does not provide any answers however they has long been uncertainty around C. taylorii.

      Reply • 26 Aug

  • Isaria spp.

    22 Jun 2012-38.3,144.1zeke1944

    5b7a41feed2a8928070000a7

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    1. zeke1944  Isaria sp. This name was given to us by the Her barium, Seen several times in the Anglesea area

      Reply • 20 Aug

    2. Cathy Powers  Isaria spp. added to dataset.

      Reply • 21 Aug

    3. John Walter  The Isaria are related to the Cordyceps

      Reply • 26 Aug

  • Cordyceps spp.

    27 Jul 2018-38.5,143.9zeke1944

    5b7a3feded2a8928070000a6

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    1. zeke1944  Larger specimen found in the Pennyroyal area. May belong to C gunnii but have never seen this shape and size in that species.

      Reply • 20 Aug

  • Cordyceps spp.

    03 Sep 2017-38.5,143.9zeke1944

    5b7a3d91ed2a8928070000a5

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    John Walter starred this.

    1. zeke1944  Smaller than any known species and a different color.

      Reply • 20 Aug

    2. John Walter  It is not dissimilar to C. hawksii and the host seems smaller than usual for that species (see my image in the Otway group). Perhaps a smaller host has produced a scaled down fruiting body however the transition between the fertile section of the club and the base, is not abrupt like you expect for C. hawksii. A very interesting find.

      Reply • 26 Aug

  • Phaeoclavulina abietina

    11 Jul 2012-38.4,144.3zeke1944

    5b7a361fed2a89c6aa000091

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    Bernie Lingham starred this.

    1. zeke1944  Ramaria abietina. Rare is Australia. Only found in 2 sites in Victoria.

      Reply • 20 Aug

    2. Cathy Powers  Phaeoclavulina abietina added to dataset. Ramaria abietina is a synonym.

      Reply • 21 Aug

  • Entoloma tomentosolilacinum

    15 May 2014-38.6,143.9zeke1944

    5b7965c8ed2a8928070000a4

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    1. zeke1944  Entoloma tomentosolilacium take 2

      Reply • 19 Aug

    2. John Walter  This set is closer to what I was expecting to see and the lower left image shows the silky fibrillose stipe and white basal tomentum. Gates gives the cap size as 5 - 15 diameter and the cap is described as lilac-grey to greyish ruby. The stipes look very dark in the upper image. One thing I have noticed after working through the images in The Entolomataceae of Tasmania, is that there is a lot of variation in colour with many species. The combination of the tomentose cap, fibrillose stipe, located on wood etc. all points to E. tomentosolilacinum. Could Entoloma tomentosolilacinum be added to the dataset please.

      Reply • 19 Aug

    3. Cathy Powers  Entoloma tomentosolilacinum added to dataset.

      Reply • 21 Aug

  • Clitopilus spp.

    30 Apr 2014-38.6,143.9zeke1944

    5b78bb34ed2a891efe00009e

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    1. John Walter  Could Clitopilus pseudopiperitus please be added to the dataset, this species is listed on ALA under its synonym Rhodocybe pseudopiperita. (correct spelling is ~piperitus)

      Reply • 19 Aug

    2. zeke1944  Clitopilus pseudopiperitus gates p4

      Reply • 22 Aug

  • Entoloma pitereka

    17 Jun 2017-38.5,144.1zeke1944

    5b78b958ed2a89402b00008c

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    1. zeke1944  Entoloma pitereka. Found at Moggs Crekk. Has a distinctive rhizomorph.

      Reply • 19 Aug

    2. John Walter  The white rhizomorphs spreading across the wood are characteristic of the species and readily separate this from the similar looking, and also pink-spored, Clitopilus hobsonii. Could Entoloma pitereka be added to the dataset.

      Reply • 19 Aug

  • Entoloma aromaticum

    03 Sep 2017-38.5,143.9zeke1944

    5b77b0b4ed2a8928070000a1

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    Lawrie Conole starred this.

    1. zeke1944  A common species found on litter. Has a sweet scent not unlike bubblegum

      Reply • 18 Aug

    2. John Walter  The translucently striate cap with the prominent nipple-like umbo make this easier to identify than many other Entoloma species.

      Reply • 19 Aug

  • Entoloma spp.

    12 Jun 2014-38.5,143.9zeke1944

    5b77a85aed2a891efe000096

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    1. zeke1944  Entoloma tomentosolilacium This name was Tentatively given by Genevieve Gates. It is quite a common species in Victoria that grows on wood, mostly fallen logs.

      Reply • 18 Aug

    2. John Walter  I can see why Gates was tentative. It does have a tomemtose cap and it is on wood which is unusual for Entoloma and I guess you could see some lilac in the stipe. I see no metallic lilac in the cap however and the shape is quite different from Gates' photos appearing in the Noordeloos and Gates paper in Persoonia in 2007, and in the 2012 book on Tasmanian Entoloma. You can readily download the paper as a pdf by Googling "Preliminary Studies in the Genus Entoloma in Tasmania", refer plate 20. Part 1 was in 2007 and Part 2 appeared in 2009. The book is more comprehensive but the pdf papers are free. I can be a bit forgiving when it comes to colour but the big broad umbo makes this one look quite different.

      Reply • 19 Aug

    3. zeke1944  Have posted the other time I have found this in the Otways. It generally does not have an umbo and the specimen of the initial image is probable unusual it was also on a very juicy log and quite vigorous.

      Reply • 19 Aug

      • John Walter  Sorry to be a pain, but if the second set is a different time and location then it is best done as a separate post. This set is closer to what I was expecting to see and the lower left image shows the silky fibrillose stipe and white basal tomentum. Gates gives the cap size as 5 - 15 diameter and the cap is described as lilac-grey to greyish ruby.

        Reply • 19 Aug

  • Entoloma uliginicola

    05 Jun 2014-38.5,144.0zeke1944

    5b77a648ed2a89c6aa00008b

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    1. zeke1944  Seen near Grassy Creek on litter. Gates p79

      Reply • 18 Aug

    2. John Walter  See also my post showing the other end of the colour spectrum.

      Reply • 19 Aug

  • Entoloma stramineopallescens

    24 Apr 2014-38.5,143.9zeke1944

    5b77a4ceed2a89c6aa00008a

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    1. zeke1944  Entoloma stramineopallescens Gates p78

      Reply • 18 Aug

    2. John Walter  Could Entoloma stramineopallescens be added to the dataset please.

      Reply • 19 Aug

    3. Cathy Powers  Entoloma stramineopallescens added to dataset.

      Reply • 21 Aug

  • Gymnogaster boletoides

    12 Jun 2014-38.5,143.9zeke1944

    Bolete truffle. Seen several times near the Sheoaks picnic area. Aprox 2 cm diam Not often found.

    5b76ac8eed2a89280700009d

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    John Walter starred this.

    1. John Walter  What a great find!

      Reply • 18 Aug

  • Conchomyces bursiformis

    11 May 2015-38.5,143.9zeke1944

    5b76ab14ed2a89c6aa000089

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    1. zeke1944  Easily confused with Crepdotus spp. Differs in that it has a short stipe and a White sporeprint.

      Reply • 19 Aug

  • Coltriciella dependens

    27 Jun 2014-38.4,144.1zeke1944

    5b7cf327ed2a89402b000091

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    1. zeke1944  Coltriciella dependens species id suggested

      Reply • 17 Aug

    2. zeke1944  Usually found under fallen timber. Mostly burnt

      Reply • 17 Aug

    3. John Walter  I note you have used the close up image and a closer view of the clump on the lower left in a FNCV report for a foray on 31/7/2016 to Kinglake NP - Masons Falls. This is the same date as this posting however you advise this is in the Otways. Can you confirm the location please. It is the aim of this site to accurately record species, location, date and time in a useful database and this is reflected in these groups also. If using composite images, they should be of the same specimen or group and definately the same location. Cheers

      Reply • 19 Aug

    4. John Walter  I have seen other images of this species of yours from Anglesea and suspect you have got your images mixed up. The other Anglesea record was dated 18/5/2014 but it plots to a different location. Cheers

      Reply • 19 Aug

    5. zeke1944  Must have overwritten the record for that location. At the moment I can't find it in 50,000 images 18/5 was in the Grampians. Watch this space. Others submitted look OK Cheers R

      Reply • 19 Aug

      • John Walter  Thanks, these records get scooped up by ALA so we are trying our hardest to keep things accurate.

        Reply • 19 Aug

  • Entoloma brevispermum

    22 May 2014-38.6,143.8zeke1944

    5b761b0ced2a89402b000087

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    1. zeke1944  Entoloma brevispermum Gates p67

      Reply • 17 Aug

    2. zeke1944  Entoloma spp. species id suggested

      Reply • 17 Aug

    3. John Walter  This is almost identical to an image of this species in Noordeloos & Gates, The Entolomataceae of Tasmania. Could Entoloma brevispermum be added to the database please.

      Reply • 18 Aug

    4. Cathy Powers  Entoloma brevispermum added to dataset.

      Reply • 21 Aug

  • Camarophyllopsis spp.

    18 Jul 2012-38.5,143.9zeke1944

    5b7d56a8ed2a891efe0000ac

    Star     Comment    

    1. zeke1944  Camarophyllus spp. species id suggested

      Reply • 17 Aug

    2. John Walter  I am not sure there is enough evidence to record it as Camarophyllopsis kearneyi. It clearly looks to be a Camarophyllopsis species, but the stipe seems too pale and we cannot see the full upper surface of the pileus to confirm the darker centre. Young describes the pileus margin as crenulate and shows it strongly so in his line drawing however his image in the same publication indicates this is not a constant feature. The correct genus is Camarophyllopsis, not Camarophyllus. Could Camarophyllopsis spp. be added to the database please.

      Reply • 18 Aug

    3. zeke1944  There is an image in one of Tony Young's books which looks a lot like this. Have posted another image of a more mature specimen

      Reply • 19 Aug

    4. Cathy Powers  Camarophyllopsis spp. added to dataset.

      Reply • 21 Aug

    5. zeke1944  The second image is from the Lake Elizabeth area and is a younger specimen

      Reply • 22 Aug

  • Chlorovibrissea melanochlora

    03 Jul 2014-38.5,143.9zeke1944

    5b753304ed2a89280700009b

    Star     Comment    

    John Walter starred this.

    1. zeke1944  Found in wet gullies on large fallen logs

      Reply • 18 Aug

  • Clitocybula sp. nov. sensu Gates & Ratkowsky(1) 2016 Streaky Yellow

    29 Apr 2017-38.6,143.9zeke1944

    5b7530e4ed2a89280700009a

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    1. zeke1944  Clitocybula sp streaky yellow. Gates p41

      Reply • 16 Aug

    2. John Walter  I have also found this species in the Wombat in Blue Gully but have not posted it yet. It is quite distinctive with the two tone gills. Could Clitocybula sp. nov. sensu Gates & Ratkowsky(1) 2016 be added to the database please and include Streaky Yellow in the common name.

      Reply • 18 Aug

    3. Cathy Powers  Dataset updated with name and common name.

      Reply • 21 Aug

  • Clitocybula spp.

    18 Jun 2017-38.6,143.9zeke1944

    5b752ecced2a89c6aa000088

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    1. zeke1944  This is Clitocybula ssp. Brick red. Gates p41.

      Reply • 16 Aug

    2. John Walter  The stipe should be thin and match the pileus colour in Clitocybula "Brick Red". This is very similar in form but I do not have any other suggestions at the moment.

      Reply • 18 Aug

    3. zeke1944  It was quite on old specimen and probable changed the color a little with age. Have seen this only once

      Reply • 19 Aug

    4. Cathy Powers  Clitocybula spp. added to dataset.

      Reply • 21 Aug

  • Badimiella pteridophila

    29 Jul 2015-38.5,144.0zeke1944

    5b752afded2a89c6aa000087

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    1. zeke1944  This is growing on Forest wire grass ( Tetrarrhena juncea) in a wet gully. rare.

      Reply • 16 Aug

    2. Lorraine Phelan  What on earth is a licenized fungus? I thought all lichen had a fungus component. (I have so much to learn. Sigh.)

      Reply • 16 Aug

      • zeke1944  Best Google the relationship it will explain it better than me. Basically ia Lichen is a symbiotic relationship between an Algae and a fungus. Most of the Fungi are ascomycota but several belong to Basidiomycota. Several of these are Corals. I'm not sure about Lichenomphalina.

        Reply • 16 Aug

      • John Walter  This gets more than a little confusing, especially as lichens are a composite organism, sometimes encompassing species from three different Kingdoms. All lichens have a fungal partner (mycobiont) but not all fungi produce lichens. Lichens are traditionally classified under the genus and species of the mycobiont and a lichenized fungus is really just another name for a lichen. This naming convention causes issues in the uncommon instances of a "chimera" lichen, more correctly known as a photosymbiodeme. Given the right fungal species and circumstances you could find that the mycobiont's mycelium forms one lichen when in contact with a particular algal species, and, if another part of the same mycelium comes into contact with the right cyanobacterium species, it also forms a completely different looking lichen that would rightly be classified as a different species. This is a conundrum for the taxonomy experts as technically both of the lichens in this example should have the same name as they share the one fungal species.

        Reply • 18 Aug

    3. John Walter  These little "helmets" or "shells" are significantly less than one millimetre high and wide and are a special structure produced by this lichen to release "conidia" or asexual spores. The structure is known as a "campylidium" and the shape is quite distinctive on this species. The thallus of this lichen lacks a cortex or skin so is not readily seen. It is a follicolose species meaning that it occurs on the foliage of plants. It also produces small discs similar to other lichens (less than 0.5 mm diameter) which release spores resulting from sexual reproduction.

      Reply • 18 Aug

  • Hispidula dicksoniae

    14 Aug 2018-38.6,143.9zeke1944

    5b72446aed2a89402b000085

    Star     Comment    

    Lorraine Phelan starred this.

    1. zeke1944  Named as Hispidula dicksoniae in Fuhrer (485)

      Reply • 14 Aug

    2. David Francis  Hispidula dicksoniae added to dataset

      Reply • 14 Aug

  • Hygrocybe reesiae

    01 Jun 2016-38.5,143.9zeke1944

    5b724368ed2a891efe000094

    Star     Comment    

    1. David Francis  Hygrocybe reesiae added/corrected.

      Reply • 14 Aug

    2. zeke1944  Hygrocybe reesiae not in data base. Seen around Blanket leaf area a couple ot times.

      Reply • 18 Aug

    3. John Walter  Are both images from the same group?

      Reply • 18 Aug

    4. zeke1944  Yes there was quite a group.

      Reply • 19 Aug

    5. John Walter  I was a bit concerned by the pale base to the stipe and whether that indicated this was H. cheelii, however there is no indication of the pink tones of that species. Could Hygrocybe reesiae be added to the database please.

      Reply • 19 Aug