799 items (page 4 of 27) (100 per page)

  • Unidentified

    21 Aug 2018Peter Clark

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    1. Peter Clark  2 pix...caterpillar.....on all things a serrated tussock.

      Reply • 22 Aug 2018

  • Unidentified

    16 Aug 2018-38.3,144.2Lorraine Phelan

    Galls on Cassytha sp.

    5b77f71bed2a891efe00009c

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    1. Leuba Ridgway  Interesting. Just been reading about Cassytha species' interesting association with wasp galls on oak ( Northern Hemisphere) but would love to know more about these galls.

      Reply • 27 Nov 2018

  • Unidentified

    12 Aug 2017-37.6,144.9Jeff Triplett

    More bud galls on Black Wattle. I have only seen this sort once. I think they might be caused by Asphondylia glabrigerminis. Species is described in P Kolesik, RJ Adair, G Eick (2010) "Six new species of Asphondylia (Diptera:Cecidomyiidae) damaging flower buds and fruit of Australian Acacia (Mimosaceae", Systematic Entomology 35:250–267. There are some poorly reproduced photos in Adair, R.J., Burgess, T., Serdani, M. and Barber, P. (2009) Fungal associations in Asphondylia (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae) galls from Australia and South Africa: implications for biological control of invasive acacias. Fungal Ecology, 2 (3). pp. 121-134.

    5b77acf5ed2a8928070000a0

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    David Francis and Leuba Ridgway starred this.

  • Unidentified

    02 Aug 2018-37.4,144.4zeke1944

    5b62e80eed2a89c6aa00007c

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    1. zeke1944  Found on a large log cat to 4cm. This is a new one on me. Gills adnate and spore probable brown..

      Reply • 02 Aug 2018

  • Unidentified

    30 Jul 2018-37.4,144.4zeke1944

    5b5eba0ded2a89c6aa00006c

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    1. zeke1944  Gates p56

      Reply • 30 Jul 2018

    2. zeke1944  Cortinarius submagellanicus

      Reply • 30 Jul 2018

    3. John Walter  Still working on this one, it does have a lot of similarity to C. submagellanicus and that is the most likely candidate but the striations are not as prominent and upper stipe colour has me wondering. Looking to eliminate other possibilities in the C. violaceus group and checking through Gasparini's Phlegmacium in Tasmania.

      Reply • 01 Aug 2018

    4. zeke1944  The color didn't come out quite right and the correct adjustment difficult . One of the flaws of otherwise a great Camera is its too easy to flip the filter wheel whilst concentrating elsewhere and there is no lock. This species is viscid which C violaceus is not. It alsao becomes brown quite quickly due to ripening spore

      Reply • 01 Aug 2018

    5. John Walter  I was expecting more prominent striations as seen on your specimens from near Forrest posted on another site on June 5. Perhaps you could add this Forrest observation with the stongly marked striations to this site and I can put it into the Otways group as a comparison and to show the range. I also expected the stipe colour that this shows at the base to extend all the way up as it does on other specimens I have tracked down from Tasmania. There is nothing else in Gasparini that is even close. Could Cortinarius submagellanicus be added to the database please.

      Reply • 01 Aug 2018

    6. Cathy Powers  Species added to dataset.

      Reply • 02 Aug 2018

  • Unidentified

    19 Jul 2018-38.6,143.7Fletcher Grant

    5b5d131ded2a892807000073

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    1. John Walter  The Tremella species (Jelly fungi) feed on other fungi, especially Stereum species. This appears to be an old, rain affected Tremella and the bracket fungus looks a lot like Stereum ostrea (now Stereum versicolor) which fits the wet climate of the location, but it could also be Stereum hirsutum. You have not entered the location on this image, but given your other images are near Mt Sabine, I have made an assumption on the location.

      Reply • 29 Jul 2018

    2. Fletcher Grant  Thanks. Yes it was in same location. Mt Sabine

      Reply • 31 Jul 2018

  • Unidentified

    19 Jul 2018-38.6,143.7Fletcher Grant

    5b5d0aafed2a892807000071

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    1. John Walter  It can be very difficult (and often impossible) to identify fungi species from photographs and sharp focus is important to see the finer details that help. This could be Clitocybe clitocyboides (as listed in most field guides) which has been renamed and is now Singerocybe clitocyboides. I cannot be sure though, so best leave it unidentified.

      Reply • 29 Jul 2018

  • Unidentified

    25 Jul 2018Peter Clark

    5b59842ced2a89280700006d

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    1. Peter Clark  2 pix..

      Reply • 26 Jul 2018

    2. zeke1944  Looks to be on soil.

      Reply • 30 Jul 2018

  • Unidentified

    25 Jul 2018Peter Clark

    5b598368ed2a89c6aa000060

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    1. Peter Clark  2 pix.

      Reply • 26 Jul 2018

  • Unidentified

    26 Jul 2018Peter Clark

    5b597d5eed2a89c6aa00005e

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    1. Peter Clark  2 pix.....single one is about 6 mm wide...tiny..

      Reply • 26 Jul 2018

  • Unidentified

    10 Jul 2018Peter Clark

    5b44645eed2a891efe000048

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    1. Peter Clark  3 pix

      Reply • 10 Jul 2018

    2. Lawrie Conole  Maybe a Senecio. Possibly S. quadridentatus??

      Reply • 11 Jul 2018

  • Unidentified

    03 Jul 2018-37.9,144.8Andrew Allen

    Beach washed jellyfish. Maybe Catostylus mosaicus (Blue Blubber)

    5b3cac50ed2a891efe000033

  • Unidentified

    01 Jul 2018-37.8,144.9Thomas Nataprawira

    5b3a0dfbed2a89c6aa00002f

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    1. John Walter  This could be Bolbitius vitellinus (as it appears in my guides) which is now known as Bolbitius titubans

      Reply • 06 Jul 2018

  • Unidentified

    27 Jun 2018Peter Clark

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    1. Peter Clark  2 pix... case moth on a gum....

      Reply • 27 Jun 2018

  • Unidentified

    27 Jun 2018Peter Clark

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    1. Peter Clark  2 pix....more of them..

      Reply • 27 Jun 2018

  • Unidentified

    26 Jun 2018Peter Clark

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    1. Peter Clark  2 pix...on a introduced gum..

      Reply • 26 Jun 2018

  • Unidentified

    26 Jun 2018Peter Clark

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    1. Peter Clark  2 pix

      Reply • 26 Jun 2018

    2. John Walter  I do not think both these images are of the same species, the one showing the gills has the "look" of a Laccaria

      Reply • 26 Jun 2018

  • Unidentified

    24 Jun 2018Peter Clark

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    1. Peter Clark  2 pix..

      Reply • 24 Jun 2018

  • Unidentified

    14 Jun 2018Peter Clark

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    1. Peter Clark  2 pix.....

      Reply • 24 Jun 2018

    2. John Walter  This is the same image as your posting on June 14 - see my comments on that image, possibly Marasmius oreades

      Reply • 24 Jun 2018

  • Unidentified

    14 Jun 2018Peter Clark

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    1. Peter Clark  3 pix....fungi..

      Reply • 14 Jun 2018

    2. John Walter  This is not Psilocybe subaeruginosa. There is no risk or danger in touching fungi, even toxic or psychoactive ones, but of course, it is good practice to wash your hands after handling anything. It is not possible to positively identify this without a look at the underside but it is remarkably like Marasmius oreades which grows in fairy rings on lawns and the like.

      Reply • 22 Jun 2018

  • Unidentified

    13 Jun 2018Peter Clark

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    1. Peter Clark  2 pix.....blackwood?....

      Reply • 13 Jun 2018

  • Unidentified

    13 Jun 2018Peter Clark

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    1. Peter Clark  2 pix....fungi...mushrooms?

      Reply • 13 Jun 2018

    2. John Walter  This is clearly an Agaricus but I do not think it is the edible Agaricus campestris. The squarish chunky look suggests it is Agaricus xanthodermus, the Yellow Stainer, which is toxic and makes most people vomit violently. That's the polite physical response, there are others. Most mushroom poisonings in Australia are caused by Agaricus xanthodermus. It is readily found en masse in lawns and nature strips after the autumn rains arrive.

      Reply • 22 Jun 2018

  • Unidentified

    06 Jun 2018-38.5,144.9Leuba Ridgway

    A robust mushroom with a purplish brown cap, about 40 mm wide. Some viscosity seen on cap which had a broad flattened umbo. The stipe was pale with blue longitudinal fibrils, widening at the base and then tapering. Gills were tan with a grey tint. Spore print tan with a hint of purple. Spotted growing on damp sandy soil, in leaf litter in a reserve of mixed natives.

    5b1be38fed2a89d0e700002c

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    1. Cathy Powers  Species added.

      Reply • 11 Jun 2018

    2. John Walter  I am sorry to quibble Leuba, but I do not think this is E. gelatinosum. I guess you are working on the brief description provided by Gates in the Tasmanian field guide however the complete description found in The Entolomataceae of Tasmania, Noordeloos and Gates 2012 provides further detail that excludes your find. This description notes that the pileus is "not translucently striate", the lamellae as "deeply emarginate to adnexed, ventricose, crowded", and the stipe as "tapering towards base". The pileus is clearly striate in your example and the lamellae are not deeply emarginate nor adnexed but appear to be adnate and they are not crowded. Your notes above and the images show your specimen's stipe is widening at the base and not tapering. It is also important to note that Entoloma have pink spores not tan.

      Reply • 18 Jun 2018

    3. John Walter  I cannot see any of the telltale tan/brown fibrils on the stipe that would indicate it is a Cortinarius, however there does appear to be a small amount of brown staining where the fibrils would be.

      Reply • 18 Jun 2018

    4. Leuba Ridgway  Hi John, Thank you for your comments and so sorry for the late response. I had no knowledge of what this fungus was so I posted all my photos on Victorian Fungi on Facebook hoping that an expert would help. Genevieve Gates had a look at it and said that it was probably E. gelatinosum because of the viscid cap. It is also frequently mistaken for a Cortinarius. Those are the exact colour of the spores - I did know that Entoloma have pink spores. I have checked other spore prints of Entoloma and they look similar to mine. The "pink" looked "tan" to me - my mistake. I do appreciate your comments but where do we go from here ?

      Reply • 05 Jul 2018

      • John Walter  Hi Leuba, Genevieve Gates certainly knows more about Entoloma than I ever hope too and much of what I have picked up has come from her work. I recall a long discussion I had with Genevieve when in the Tarkine in Tasmania a few years ago now. The topic was the inability of fungi to conform to our ideas of species definition, or, to put it more correctly, our inability to see past the many variations in colour and form of fungi when attempting to make identifications. I agree that your spore print looked more tan than pink, but today I am viewing it on a different computer and screen and this device renders the colour as clearly pink! The general morphology indicates an Entoloma species and 'The Entolomataceae of Tasmania' lists the viscosity of the cap as a key identification feature of E. gelatinosum. Also, I have not found any other Entolomas in that publication that have a viscid cap. The most troubling part for me is the statement in the description that the pileus is "not translucently striate". It is quite common to state that a species is translucently striate, but it is very unusual to see a species listed as not being so, which indicates to me that this is an important feature. I have not counted exactly, but approximately 30 different collections were examined when preparing the Tassie publication on Entoloma. Have you kept the spore print? If so, perhaps we can work out a way or me to examine some of the spores under my microscope which may shed some light on this. My email address is public on Natureshare and you are welcome to contact me directly on this.

        Reply • 09 Jul 2018

        • Leuba Ridgway  Hello John, I have been away from this site for awhile so haven't been able to respond. I totally agree with what you say - it is difficult to identify specimens with such scant knowledge. Unfortunately I destroyed the spore prints soon after collection. But I will remove the Id as it is misleading. Again, I appreciate your willingness to discuss this with me. I do remember where I collected this specimen and might visit the area in Winter if this Dry does not persist...thanks again.

          Reply • 27 Nov 2018

  • Unidentified

    04 Jun 2018-37.8,144.9Thomas Nataprawira

    A group of fungi.

    5b152202ed2a89b04700001a

  • Unidentified

    27 May 2018-38.1,141.7Lorraine Phelan

    A bracket fungus on fallen timber.

    5b0f339aed2a89b047000013

  • Unidentified

    28 May 2018-33.0,151.7Cynthia Isley

    bee on fireweed

    5b0bd6a9ed2a89d0e7000018

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    1. David Francis  Hi Cynthia. An interesting observation. Are you sure of the species? It's a bit hard to confirm from the photo.

      Reply • 29 May 2018

    2. David Francis  This looks more like a common hoverfly, but hard to tell.

      Reply • 31 May 2018

  • Unidentified

    22 May 2018-38.5,143.9Lorraine Phelan

    5b0b3e8fed2a89e822000011

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    1. Mark Ridgway  Possibly 'Chondrostereum purpureum' depending what it was on.

      Reply • 28 May 2018

  • Unidentified

    12 May 2018Peter Clark

    5af930b2ed2a89b047000005

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    1. Peter Clark  3 pix....on a gum leaf on the ground.

      Reply • 14 May 2018

  • Unidentified

    01 Nov 2017Geoff Derrin

    5af8d0b3ed2a89e822000002

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    1. Geoff Derrin  Many specimens of this small tree were growing near Coombell Road, about 2.5 km west of the Summerland Way near Casino

      Reply • 14 May 2018

    2. Andrew Brown  3 different species here so they should be uploaded as separate observations Geoff. This site is set up for Victorian observations.

      Reply • 16 May 2018

  • Unidentified

    20 Apr 2018-36.8,144.4Andrew Brown

    Not a good photo but maybe good enough for id?

    5af6da3ded2a89b047000002

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    1. Cathy Powers  Size would help with this ID.

      Reply • 13 May 2018