146 items (page 2 of 5) (100 per page)

  • Tortricopsis pyroptis

    10 Jan 2018-37.9,145.3Leuba Ridgway

    A small attractive moth that looked almost square because of a hunched back. Satiny wings were a creamy colour deepening to a reddish-brown towards the trailing margins. Two lines of small black dots slanted downwards from the mid-costal area. Wing span - 20 mm. Drawn to bright garden lights. Mixed natives in the area.

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  • Dysbatus sp. (1)

    05 Jan 2018-37.9,145.3Leuba Ridgway

    A moth with a wing span of about 30 mm. It was more grey than brown with the fore wings showing a central transverse band. Each fore wing had two oblique black lines, one running from wing base downwards to the inner margin and a shorter one from the apex of each fore wing running upwards. Spotted under bright lights on a warm night in a suburban garden. Mixed native trees around. Also near a national park. I am hoping the moth will return tonight so I can get a better shot/natural light. Thanks to Cathy Powers for confirming this as Dysbatus.

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    1. Cathy Powers  Leuba - I am fairly certain that this is Dysbatus sp. 1. The lines match the description. It is in Moths of Victoria Part 5 and there is a CD page that details the difference between sp. 1 and D. singularis. The light has changed the colour of the moth which is usually grey.

      Reply • 06 Jan 2018

      • Leuba Ridgway  Thank you Cathy. I was fairly certain it was Dysbatus just the oblique marking threw me. I am not able to access the CD at the moment but will have a look soon.

        Reply • 06 Jan 2018

  • Dysbatus sp. (1)

    28 Dec 2017-37.9,145.3Leuba Ridgway

    This moth had an attractive shimmer to its grey-brown wings. The wing veins stood out and were a distinctive brown. Each fore wing had two thin transverse black lines that together formed a band when at rest. Within the band was a small black crescent shaped mark. A narrow black line traversed the thorax along the anterior edge. Underside of wings were pale with dark sooty patches nearer the trailing margins. Wing span would have been about 30 mm. Spotted in a suburban garden. Probably attracted to lights at night. Thanks to Cathy Powers for the ID.

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    1. Cathy Powers  Leuba - This is Dysbatus sp (1) - beautiful specimen.

      Reply • 30 Dec 2017

      • Leuba Ridgway  Cathy, Please know that when I cry for help with moths I am hoping that you would have a look at them. Didn't know if it would be appropriate to refer them directly to you. Thanks for confirming this as Dysbatus - this is the best specimen I've got so far.

        Reply • 03 Jan 2018

  • Stereocaulon ramulosum

    18 Nov 2017-37.9,146.4Leuba Ridgway

    These attractive clumps of pale grey lichen were seen on rocks. They appeared to start of as regular clumps with soft tight branches with minute convoluted bluish grey pads. The branches appeared to open up into long pendulous filamentous strands ending in rounded brown apothecia. Spotted on rocks at an altitude of 1200 mts. in a national park (Baw Baw NP) Wondering if this is a species of Cladonia. Any help with an ID will be greatly appreciated. Thanks.

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    1. John Walter  This is Stereocaulon ramulosum - the brownish tips are the spore releasing apothecia and the blue-grey warty lumps are called cephalodia. This species has a dual symbiosis, the fungus and a green alga in the main structure and the fungus and a cyanobacterium in the cephalodia. Hence it represents three different kingdoms!

      Reply • 16 Dec 2017

      • Leuba Ridgway  Thank you very much for the information and ID John- how interesting. I am so pleased I spotted this attractive lichen.

        Reply • 23 Dec 2017

    2. David Francis  Intriguing information. Stereocaulon ramulosum now ready for use in the database. Please add id.

      Reply • 18 Dec 2017

      • Leuba Ridgway  Thank you David. I am pleased I posted it on NS -always get expert help.

        Reply • 23 Dec 2017

    3. John Walter  Stereocaulon ramulosum species id suggested

      Reply • 18 Dec 2017

    4. Leuba Ridgway  Thank you John for adding the ID.

      Reply • 23 Dec 2017

  • Idaea philocosma Flecked Wave

    13 Dec 2017-37.9,145.3Leuba Ridgway

    This slightly pearly, creamy moth had a wing span of about 20 mm. The wings had dark flecks - about three rows on the fore wings and two on the hind wings. The trailing margin of each wing had a thin dark broken line and a short white fringe. Attracted to garden lights on a warm night - mixed native trees around.

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  • Garrha ocellifera

    13 Dec 2017-37.9,145.3Leuba Ridgway

    This small silky peach-coloured moth had a large irregularly shaped black patch in the middle of each fore wing. Small black specks were sen along the trailing margin and the sub-marginal border. Thorax was also a sooty black. Wing span was about 15 mm. Spotted under bright lights in suburban garden. Plenty of native trees around.

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    1. Lauren Fraser  How beautiful!

      Reply • 14 Dec 2017

  • Apricia jovialis Australian Jumping Spider

    07 Dec 2017-37.9,145.3Leuba Ridgway

    This attractive jumping spider was just a little over 5 mm long. The body was black with a banded yellow pattern on the abdomen. Legs were brown and pedipalps were covered with white hairs. Spotted on outer wall -suburban house.

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  • Caladenia alpina Mountain Hood-orchid

    18 Nov 2017-37.9,146.4Leuba Ridgway

    These beautiful orchids were about 25 cms tall. Flowers were on stout stems with pink tinges on the hood-forming central sepal. The other sepals and petals were spread out. The labellum had dark reddish spots and transverse bars. Leaves were fleshy and lanceolate (partially visible in photo). Spotted along the track in an alpine national park (Baw Baw NP)

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  • Oxyopes spp. Lynx Spider

    29 Nov 2017-37.9,145.3Leuba Ridgway

    This small lynx spider had a leg span of about 10 to 12 mm. Legs were pale, long and spikey. The body had black and white stripes through the length of it and what looked like a fuzz of fine red hairs around the cephalothorax making it look like an attractive two-toned spider at a glance. Palps were large and dark suggesting that it was male. Spotted in a suburban garden.

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    1. Chris Lindorff  Amazing legs.

      Reply • 04 Dec 2017

  • Endosimilis stilbealis

    29 Nov 2017-37.9,145.3Leuba Ridgway

    This is one of the most attractive of pyralids. It sat upright resting on its legs, hlding up a recurved abdomen. Wings ( span about 15 mm) were a beautiful and rich mix of deep red and orange. The fore wings were divided into three parts with the mid section showing a dark spot near the costa. Antennae were swept back. Attracted to bright lights in the house. My thanks to Cathy Powers for the ID.

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    1. Cathy Powers  Added.

      Reply • 30 Nov 2017

    2. Cathy Powers  Leuba - from my investigations, Persicoptera aglaopa has different markings on the hindwing than your image. It has yellow with a dark band at the outer margin of the hindwing. This appears to be more like Endosimilis stilbealis - perhaps gender specific.

      Reply • 30 Nov 2017

    3. Leuba Ridgway  Thank you Cathy. I believe you are right. I found a moth very similar in colour to mine on Barcodinglife.com and it was E.stilbealis.

      Reply • 03 Dec 2017

  • Unidentified

    16 Dec 2013-37.9,145.3Leuba Ridgway

    This large cossid moth had a wing span of at least 70 mm. There were no patterns on its grey wings however, the wings looked like sand-paper. The hind wings were shorter and a beautiful purplish brown. some of this colour was also seen in the abdominal segments nearer the thorax. Abdomen was very thick. antennae were short, feathery and brown. It was interesting to see this moth in flight - lifting its heavy body into the air after a short "taxiing". On ground, the moth could be heard fluttering from several metres away. Spotted under bright lights near a national park. Need help to ID this large cossid. thanks.

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  • Endoxyla secta

    30 Jan 2014-37.9,145.3Leuba Ridgway

    This Cossid moth would have had a wingspan of about 60 mm. Short black lines marked both fore wings. Broad white streaks near the costal margins made this moth stand out from the other grey cossids. Spotted under bright lights near a national park.

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  • Unidentified

    21 Jan 2013-37.9,145.3Leuba Ridgway

    A beautiful speckled grey and silver moth about 35mm long. Thorax had a distinct inverted "V" in black. Legs were heavily "furry" and antennae, feathery nearer the base. Hind wings were a pearly brown. Abdomen was quite thick. Again, spotted under bright lights near a national park with mixed natives.

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  • Unidentified

    21 Dec 2013-37.9,145.3Leuba Ridgway

    A Cossid moth about 40 mm long. Fore wings were a pale grey with a central darker area. Midway along the costa was a semicircular patch of white. A short diagonal patch of dark grey was seen along the trailing edge of the fore wings. The thorax had the inverted black "V" as in all most other cossids. Spotted under bright lights near native trees. One of many cossids spotted that year. According to Peter Marriott , this is near Trismelasmos donovani. My thanks to Peter M for the ID and to Cathy Powers for facilitating the identification.

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    1. Cathy Powers  Leuba - this is sp. near Trismelasmos donovani with the ID assistance by Peter Marriott.

      Reply • 30 Nov 2017

  • Endoxyla spp.

    28 Jan 2014-37.9,145.3Leuba Ridgway

    A fawn-coloured Cossid about 40 mm long, No distinct patterns on wings but darker along the veins. Antennae were brown and feathery. Thorax had a faint dark inverted "V" shape. Spotted under bright lights near a national park. I believe this is an Endoxyla moth. My thanks to peter Marriott for confirming the genus.

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    1. Cathy Powers  Leuba - Peter Marriott says it is an Endoxyla sp. with most of these with no name. Moths of Victoria volume 10 should assist but that is a work in progress.

      Reply • 30 Nov 2017

  • Endoxyla spp.

    11 Jan 2014-37.9,145.3Leuba Ridgway

    This gigantic and heavy moth was about 65 mm long and looked like a roll of burnt paper. The fore wings had attractive blotchy patches of black, brown, grey and white with the inner margins folding over each other in a wave. The grey thorax had two short black tufts of setae. Antennae were smooth and short. The abdomen was covered with dense grey setae; it looked and felt heavy. Spotted under bright lights near a national park.

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    1. Mark Ridgway  Maybe E lituratus ?

      Reply • 29 Nov 2017

    2. Cathy Powers  Probably best to list this as Endoxyla sp until further work is done on this group.

      Reply • 30 Nov 2017

  • Endoxyla spp.

    16 Jan 2014-37.9,145.3Leuba Ridgway

    This cossid moth was about 45 mm long. Mostly grey with tinges of light brown. The basal part of the fore wings had hatched markings of dark grey, the pattern running down to the apices of each wing. Hind wings were grey with the colour fading towards the sub marginal area. On each side of the thorax, running along the length of it was a broad band of dense white setae and just inside the band was a black line of setae ending posteriorly in a thick tuft. Antennae were feathery. Spotted under bright lights near national park.

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    1. Cathy Powers  Probably best for this to be Endoxyla sp until further ID assistance is acquired.

      Reply • 30 Nov 2017

  • Culama anthracica

    22 Jan 2014-37.9,145.3Leuba Ridgway

    This cossid moth was all grey with thin black lines across the wings like tiger-skin stripes, with the pattern changing slightly in the submarginal area. The thorax had dense grey and white setae. Antennae were feathery - male. Wing span about 50 mm. My thanks to Cathy Powers & Peter Marriott for the ID.

    5a1e83eced2a893984000794

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    1. Mark Ridgway  Interesting to compare https://natureshare.org.au/observations/54e878fced2a89d990000624?display=thumbnails&order_by=created_at&user_id=Leuba

      Reply • 29 Nov 2017

    2. Cathy Powers  Leuba - this is Culama anthracica with the ID assistance of Peter Marriott.

      Reply • 30 Nov 2017

      • Leuba Ridgway  Thank you both Cathy Powers & Peter Marriott, for the ID. It's great I've got two species of Culama !

        Reply • 30 Nov 2017

  • Stigmatium spp.

    17 Nov 2017-38.0,146.4Leuba Ridgway

    A black beetle about 25 mm long with bands of brown, black and white patterns on the elytra and thorax. There were small patches of brown at the apices. . The elytra and thorax were covered with short stiff setae and each elytron had a narrow white line near the apex. The thorax was narrower posteriorly. The head had a crown-shaped pattern posterior to the eyes.

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  • Heliomystis electrica

    13 Nov 2017-37.9,145.3Leuba Ridgway

    A brown moth with wing span about 40 mm. Thorax was covered with short dense brown setae. Fore wings were sectioned into three by thin dark jagged lines. The hind wings were a bright orange with dark brown sub marginal area. Antennae were feathery. This moth was high up on the wall so the photo is a little skewed. Also, could not get rid of the pesky alates that were everywhere last night. My thanks to Cathy Powers for the ID.

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    1. Cathy Powers  Hello Leuba - This is Heliomystis electrica (Geometridae - MOV 4)

      Reply • 14 Nov 2017

    2. Leuba Ridgway  Thanks so much Cathy. I should have had a better look, especially with all the MoV books at hand.

      Reply • 14 Nov 2017

  • Schedotrioza spp. Gall-insect Psyllid

    28 Sep 2017-37.9,145.3Leuba Ridgway

    These were attractive thin-walled urn-shaped galls that appeared to be about 10 to 12 mm tall. The apical openings through which the adults would have emerged had jagged edges which were a deep pink. This colour bled into the pale green bodies and bases of the galls. Spotted on the upper surface of eucalyptus leaves - Gum tree species not known.

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  • Stanwellia grisea Melbourne Trap-door Spider Melbourne Trapdoor Spider

    14 Jun 2017-37.9,145.3Leuba Ridgway

    A long-legged dark brown spider with large fangs spotted crawling around the back yard. Fine short hairs on the legs and abdomen gave it a silky look. The small abdomen and large palps suggest that it's a male.

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  • Unidentified

    10 Sep 2017-37.9,145.3Leuba Ridgway

    A pale moth with a wing span of about 20 mm. Each fore wing had a slightly dark patch outlined by dark flecks. Labial palps were close together, stout and recurved with dense setae at the base. Trailing fore wing margins were fringed. I need help with identifying this moth. Thanks. I have checked Oecophoridae and Gelechioidea but can't find a match !

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  • Praxis pandesma Variable Praxis

    01 Aug 2017-37.9,145.3Leuba Ridgway

    A dark moth with a wing span of about 35 to 40 mm with dense setae on thorax and legs. Fore wings had scalloped trailing margins. Faint flecks of yellow-green were seen on costa and submarginal areas of wings. Feathery antennae were a deep red. Labial palps short. Could not make out much else against the darkness of the velvety wings but could see fine wavy lines. There were about three of these moths around bright lights on a cool evening. My thanks to Cathy Powers and Peter Marriott for the ID.

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    1. Cathy Powers  Leuba - looks like a Praxis but I will search further.

      Reply • 31 Aug 2017

    2. Cathy Powers  This is Praxis pandesma and the ID has been confirmed by Peter Marriott. This genus will be featured in MOV8 due to be published this year.

      Reply • 31 Aug 2017

      • Leuba Ridgway  Thank you so much Cathy & Peter Marriott- a new one for me ! and quite an attractive moth.

        Reply • 03 Sep 2017

  • Apiomorpha frenchi

    22 Jul 2017-33.9,148.0Leuba Ridgway

    An almost cylindrical gall with a slightly broader base (point of attachment to the stem). The gall appeared woody with a rough exterior. A drier gall seen on the same tree appeared to have annular splits. The apical end of the gall had rounded edges with a depressed centre and perfectly circular hole. Spotted on ? Eucalyptus blakelyi (Blakely's red gum) in the Weddin Mountains National Park, NSW.

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    1. David Francis  Apiomorpha frenchi added to database

      Reply • 31 Jul 2017

      • Leuba Ridgway  Thank you David. Sorry I couldn't respond earlier.

        Reply • 28 Aug 2017

  • Creiis corniculatus Eastern Horn Lerp

    26 Jul 2017-34.1,146.2Leuba Ridgway

    These were small slightly flattened trumpet-shaped lerps spotted on eucalyptus leaves. The broader part of these lerps were transparent and appeared fragile. Each of these lerps appeared to have a nymph inside with their pale orange bodies clearly visible through the transparent lerp shell. Unlike lerps of Glycaspis species, I could not see any ants crawling around these lerps. I assume therefore that these lerps are not made of the same material as the Glycaspis species. Also, this species of Creiis lerps seemed keratinous. Various birds feed on lerps but a study on lerp-feeding by birds suggests that birds avoided the Creiis species of lerps. Spotted on Mugga Ironbark (Eucalyptus sideroxylon) in the Cocoparra National Park, New South Wales

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    1. David Francis  Creiis corniculatus added to db.

      Reply • 31 Jul 2017

  • Bondia nigella

    23 Jun 2017-37.9,145.3Leuba Ridgway

    A small silky black moth about 6 mm long with tufts of scales on the fore wings. On each fore wing was a small gold crescent, about one-third of the distance from the trailing margin. Labial palps were recurved and covered with setae. Some banding in the legs visible. Spotted under bright lights after a warm day near a national park (Dandenong Ranges) My thanks to Cathy Powers who has identified this beauty as Bondia nigella. Family: Carposinidae ( Please add Bondia nigella. Thank you.)

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    1. Cathy Powers  Beautiful, Leuba. I will work on ID help.

      Reply • 25 Jun 2017

      • Leuba Ridgway  Thank you Cathy. Was hoping you'd see it - sorry about the "blue" overall colour.

        Reply • 26 Jun 2017

    2. Cathy Powers  How about Bondia nigella in the Carposinidae family?

      Reply • 27 Jun 2017

    3. Cathy Powers  B. nigella added to species list.

      Reply • 01 Jul 2017

    4. Cathy Powers  Bondia nigella species id suggested

      Reply • 10 Jul 2017

  • Cymatoderma elegans

    16 May 2017-37.8,148.5Leuba Ridgway

    A large brown paper-thin fruiting body with a ruffled upper surface and beautiful white pore surface (underside) arising from a damp log. The fruiting body had a very short stipe. Spotted in a temperate rain forest. My thanks to John Walter for the ID and information highlighting differences between Podoscypha and Cymatoderma.

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    1. John Walter  Hi Leuba, this looks more like Cymatoderma elegans, it has much larger funnels than the Podoscypha and the wrinkled white underside is not seen on the Podoscypha

      Reply • 16 Dec 2017

      • Leuba Ridgway  Thanks again John. It's so good to have the added information. Love the dramatic underside and so pleased to have one I've never seen before. Sorry I couldn't amend the ID sooner.

        Reply • 23 Dec 2017

  • Unidentified

    06 Jun 2017-37.9,145.3Leuba Ridgway

    A handsome ghost moth with dark tented wings . The wings had a span of about 40 mm and showed pale curvy patterns. Antennae were feathery and the thorax had dense brown setae. Spotted near a national park - mixed native trees.

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    1. Cathy Powers  Leuba, I have been learning more about Heps and this is not Oncopera. Oncopera (both male and female) have short antennae. I will see if I can track down the ID because I don't know it.

      Reply • 01 Mar

      • Leuba Ridgway  Thank you for checking this one. I only just got to see this. I'll wait to hear from you.

        Reply • 04 May

        • Cathy Powers  Hello Leuba - I finally cracked the ID. It is Oxycanus antipoda.

          Reply • 07 May

  • Phaeographis mucronata

    16 May 2017-37.8,148.5Leuba Ridgway

    Small pale greyish-white plaques (photobiont) were seen on moist thick bark of a eucalypt. Each of these plaques had a scribbly lead-grey pattern. These long, branched reproductive parts (Lirellae) are the apothecia. Spotted on coastal banksia - Snowy River Estuary.

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    1. David Francis  Phaeographis mucronata added to db. ALA has Graphis mucronata as a syn. Your obs are always very enigmatic, Leuba!

      Reply • 25 May 2017

      • Leuba Ridgway  Thank you for adding the ID David. My obs are enigmatic you say.. I don't have fantastic photographic equipment so I am forced to take shots of things that will not fly or run away from me but more often than not these specimens have very interesting life cycles and associations. I take shots of anything unusual and then research it afterwards - it's been great learning & very interesting so far !

        Reply • 25 May 2017