128 items (page 1 of 5) (100 per page)

  • Aulactinia veratra Common Green Anemone

    22 Mar 2018-37.8,148.7Leuba Ridgway

    The anemone was about 50 mm with tentacles extended and floating in the water. Tentacles were numerous, translucent but dark green in colour and had pointy ends. The oral disc was covered by sand and therefore not visible. Where the anemones were out of water, they looked like dark clumps studded with sand grains. Partially submerged anemones (pic 3) were interesting in that the submerged part had extended tentacles and the exposed part was curled up displaying a sand encrusted column. Long striations could be seen in the retracted column which was the same colour as the tentacles. Spotted in rock pools - rocky intertidal zone (Cape Conran)

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    1. David Francis  Name added to db https://natureshare.org.au/species/aulactinia_veratra (new name).

      Reply • 04 Apr

    2. Leuba Ridgway  Thank you David.

      Reply • 04 Apr

  • Rhipicera (Agathorhipis) femorata Fan-horned Beetle Feather-horned Beetle

    13 Mar 2018-37.2,145.4Leuba Ridgway

    A black wedge-shaped beetle about 15 mm long with white specks on elytra and dramatically flabellate antennae. Legs were a deep brown with black colouring at the femoral and tibial joint. A slightly humped scutellum and head were also black. Spotted on a young eucalyptus tree in a small reserve. The larvae are ecto-and endoparasitic on other insect larvae, possibly of cicada. Commonly called feather-horned beetle.

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    1. David Francis  See https://natureshare.org.au/observations?species=Rhipicera+%28Agathorhipis%29+femorata Already in database.

      Reply • 30 Mar

    2. Leuba Ridgway  Thank you David. Sorry, don't know how I missed it.

      Reply • 30 Mar

  • Brachidontes rostratus Beaked Mussel

    22 Mar 2018-37.8,148.7Leuba Ridgway

    These mussels were about 40 mm long. The purple shells had black rims with thin curved lines. They were seen in clusters and were of varying sizes. Spotted on exposed rocks - rocky shoreline in the intertidal area ( Cape Conran, Victoria)

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    1. David Francis  Brachidontes rostratus added.

      Reply • 30 Mar

  • Galeolaria caespitosa Intertidal Tubeworm

    22 Mar 2018-37.8,148.7Leuba Ridgway

    This mass resembling worn coral was about 10 cms across. On the surface were crescent shaped structures which were the open ends of calcareous tubes constructed by tubeworms. They have clustered together and probably grown on a snail, completely enveloping it and forming a hard mass, as suggested by Audrey Falconer(Marine Research). The mass was partially covered with sand but red algae could be seen growing on the mass. The tubes are built by annelid fanworms from the family Serpulidae. The worms have branchial crowns in two lobes, one of them has a stalked operculum (lid). The branchial croown form the gills and also helps to capture food. The worm lives within the tube and retracts into the tube when in danger or when the tide is out, pulling the operculum down tight to shut the opening of the tube. A dense mass of tubes can form a microhabitat for other marine creatures. My thanks to Audrey Falconer ( Marine Research) for identifying this mass. Spotted in a rock pool in an intertidal zone of a rocky shoreline ( Cape Conran, Victoria). These tubeworms are seen from Southern Queensland all along the southern coast to Western Australia.

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    1. David Francis  Galeolaria caespitosa added to db. Location doesn't completely rule out the morphologically identical Galeolaria gemineoa, separated by DNA studies. See http://portphillipmarinelife.net.au/species/11175

      Reply • 30 Mar

      • Leuba Ridgway  Thank you for adding the ID to the database David and your message. Prior to posting here I sought help from the Marine Research Group of The Field Naturalists Club of Victoria. Audrey Falconer (an expert on Marine Invertebrates) provided me the ID. Also given the location where it was found, I believe the species to be correct. I also checked the Port Phillip marine life web site as it's very useful.

        Reply • 30 Mar

  • Meridiastra calcar Carpet Sea Star Eight-armed Cushion Star

    22 Mar 2018-37.8,148.7Leuba Ridgway

    An eight-armed carpet sea star with greenish grey colouring. The arms showed some red along the margins. The body pattern included small white scalloping and the central disc was a beautiful green. The arms were well defined ending in thick rounded tips. This sea star was about 50 mm across. Spotted in a rock pool - intertidal rocky shore (Cape Conran) facing the Bass Strait. They occur all around the Australian coast.

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  • Sypharochiton pelliserpentis Snakeskin Chiton

    22 Mar 2018-37.8,148.7Leuba Ridgway

    A mollusc with a flattened body and eight distinctive overlapping plates that protect them from predators and crashing waves. This chiton was grey-green in colour, about 63 mm x 35 mm. The girdle encircling the plates had a snake-skin like appearance giving it the common name "snakeskin chiton". These chitons were found along with barnacles, attached to the side of a rock in an intertidal rocky shore (Cape Conran) off the south coast of Victoria facing the Bass Strait. This species is said to prefer rock surfaces in the mid-tide region, rather than under rocks in lower -or sub-tidal zones.

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    Chris Lindorff, Cathy Powers, David Francis and 1 others starred this.

    1. David Francis  Sypharochiton pelliserpentis added to the db.

      Reply • 30 Mar

    2. David Francis  Barnacle family, Synagogidae also added.

      Reply • 30 Mar

  • Endotricha spp.

    06 Feb 2018-37.9,145.3Leuba Ridgway

    This moth had a wing span of 20 mm. Typical to this species, it stood on it's front legs holding it's up-curved abdomen in the air with the apices of the fore wings resting on either side. The wings were a mix of grey and brown with thin wavy lines. The costa had white markings down the whole length. Spotted under bright garden light. Unsure of the ID as there are a few with varying wing patterns and colour.

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  • Hydroclathrus clathratus

    20 Jan 2018-38.4,145.1Leuba Ridgway

    A brown algae with a thallus (body) with multiple holes of varying sizes. The algae is said to be about 10 cm in diameter. But in the one that was washed ashore it was a loose mesh like a woolen hair net. The whole mass was compressible and soft. Found on the inter-tidal zone off Western Port Bay (Balnarring Beach). They are said to grow in the tidal zone. 'Hydro' = water, 'Clathrus' = mesh This species forms dense mats.

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    1. David Francis  Hydroclathrus clathratus added. Great to see some marine biodiversity!

      Reply • 27 Jan

  • Aplysia sydneyensis Sea Hare

    20 Jan 2018-38.4,145.1Leuba Ridgway

    This sea slug would have been about 5 " in length. It had mottling of cream and brown. The ear-like sensory clubs or rhinophores and oral tentacle were withdrawn and the usually extended side flaps called parapodia were flipped back. The mantle and atrophied shell could be seen (pic 5) as a reddish radiating structure. I have the expert Mattt Nimbs to thank for the ID. He says "Definitely Aplysia. And yes probably A sydneyensis, there is a wheel like pattern of radiating stripes on the mantle that sits over the vestigial shell: a distinguishing characteristic of sydneyensis"

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    1. David Francis  Aplysia sydneyensis added.

      Reply • 27 Jan

    2. Leuba Ridgway  Thank you David.

      Reply • 01 Feb

  • Zonaria spp.

    20 Jan 2018-38.4,145.1Leuba Ridgway

    A small clump of brown algae (Phaeophyceae) with flat dark lower branches and twisted paler tips. Spotted on a tidal zone - Balnarring beach ( Westernport Bay). My thanks to Janine Baker for identifying the genus. Possibly Z.spiralis

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    1. David Francis  Zonaria spp. added. (NS adds the group/plural name: spp. = set of all Zonaria species).

      Reply • 27 Jan

    2. Leuba Ridgway  Thanks !

      Reply • 01 Feb

  • Thuretia quercifolia

    20 Jan 2018-38.4,145.1Leuba Ridgway

    A dense clump of pale orange seaweed (red algae) with oak-leaf shaped fronds/thalli. Washed-up onto the beach off Westernport Bay (Balnarring Beach). This species gets it's name "quercifolia" fro the oak-shaped fronds. It is reported that this is a common and distinctive species found in deep waters in the rough-water coasts of southern Australia. My thanks to Janine Baker for the ID.

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    1. David Francis  Thuretia quercifolia added. I was surprised to discover that the Red Algae are separated from the Green and Brown Algae at the Kingdom level!

      Reply • 27 Jan

      • Leuba Ridgway  Thanks David. I have to read about these everytime to refresh my memory. I have several others but might be difficult to identify them.

        Reply • 01 Feb

  • Chloroclystis filata

    17 Jan 2018-37.9,145.3Leuba Ridgway

    An attractive moth with patches of rust brown and grey on the fore wings and narrow white wavy transverse bands that dipped down at the apices. Hind wings showed thin wavy brown lines and a broader white band near the trailing margin. The under side of the silky wings were pale. Wing span about 20 mm. Spotted under bright garden lights.

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  • Tortricopsis pyroptis

    10 Jan 2018-37.9,145.3Leuba Ridgway

    A small attractive moth that looked almost square because of a hunched back. Satiny wings were a creamy colour deepening to a reddish-brown towards the trailing margins. Two lines of small black dots slanted downwards from the mid-costal area. Wing span - 20 mm. Drawn to bright garden lights. Mixed natives in the area.

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  • Dysbatus sp. (1)

    05 Jan 2018-37.9,145.3Leuba Ridgway

    A moth with a wing span of about 30 mm. It was more grey than brown with the fore wings showing a central transverse band. Each fore wing had two oblique black lines, one running from wing base downwards to the inner margin and a shorter one from the apex of each fore wing running upwards. Spotted under bright lights on a warm night in a suburban garden. Mixed native trees around. Also near a national park. I am hoping the moth will return tonight so I can get a better shot/natural light. Thanks to Cathy Powers for confirming this as Dysbatus.

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    1. Cathy Powers  Leuba - I am fairly certain that this is Dysbatus sp. 1. The lines match the description. It is in Moths of Victoria Part 5 and there is a CD page that details the difference between sp. 1 and D. singularis. The light has changed the colour of the moth which is usually grey.

      Reply • 06 Jan

      • Leuba Ridgway  Thank you Cathy. I was fairly certain it was Dysbatus just the oblique marking threw me. I am not able to access the CD at the moment but will have a look soon.

        Reply • 06 Jan

  • Dysbatus sp. (1)

    28 Dec 2017-37.9,145.3Leuba Ridgway

    This moth had an attractive shimmer to its grey-brown wings. The wing veins stood out and were a distinctive brown. Each fore wing had two thin transverse black lines that together formed a band when at rest. Within the band was a small black crescent shaped mark. A narrow black line traversed the thorax along the anterior edge. Underside of wings were pale with dark sooty patches nearer the trailing margins. Wing span would have been about 30 mm. Spotted in a suburban garden. Probably attracted to lights at night. Thanks to Cathy Powers for the ID.

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    1. Cathy Powers  Leuba - This is Dysbatus sp (1) - beautiful specimen.

      Reply • 30 Dec 2017

      • Leuba Ridgway  Cathy, Please know that when I cry for help with moths I am hoping that you would have a look at them. Didn't know if it would be appropriate to refer them directly to you. Thanks for confirming this as Dysbatus - this is the best specimen I've got so far.

        Reply • 03 Jan

  • Stereocaulon ramulosum

    18 Nov 2017-37.9,146.4Leuba Ridgway

    These attractive clumps of pale grey lichen were seen on rocks. They appeared to start of as regular clumps with soft tight branches with minute convoluted bluish grey pads. The branches appeared to open up into long pendulous filamentous strands ending in rounded brown apothecia. Spotted on rocks at an altitude of 1200 mts. in a national park (Baw Baw NP) Wondering if this is a species of Cladonia. Any help with an ID will be greatly appreciated. Thanks.

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    1. John Walter  This is Stereocaulon ramulosum - the brownish tips are the spore releasing apothecia and the blue-grey warty lumps are called cephalodia. This species has a dual symbiosis, the fungus and a green alga in the main structure and the fungus and a cyanobacterium in the cephalodia. Hence it represents three different kingdoms!

      Reply • 16 Dec 2017

      • Leuba Ridgway  Thank you very much for the information and ID John- how interesting. I am so pleased I spotted this attractive lichen.

        Reply • 23 Dec 2017

    2. David Francis  Intriguing information. Stereocaulon ramulosum now ready for use in the database. Please add id.

      Reply • 18 Dec 2017

      • Leuba Ridgway  Thank you David. I am pleased I posted it on NS -always get expert help.

        Reply • 23 Dec 2017

    3. John Walter  Stereocaulon ramulosum species id suggested

      Reply • 18 Dec 2017

    4. Leuba Ridgway  Thank you John for adding the ID.

      Reply • 23 Dec 2017

  • Idaea philocosma Flecked Wave

    13 Dec 2017-37.9,145.3Leuba Ridgway

    This slightly pearly, creamy moth had a wing span of about 20 mm. The wings had dark flecks - about three rows on the fore wings and two on the hind wings. The trailing margin of each wing had a thin dark broken line and a short white fringe. Attracted to garden lights on a warm night - mixed native trees around.

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  • Garrha ocellifera

    13 Dec 2017-37.9,145.3Leuba Ridgway

    This small silky peach-coloured moth had a large irregularly shaped black patch in the middle of each fore wing. Small black specks were sen along the trailing margin and the sub-marginal border. Thorax was also a sooty black. Wing span was about 15 mm. Spotted under bright lights in suburban garden. Plenty of native trees around.

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    1. Lauren Fraser  How beautiful!

      Reply • 14 Dec 2017

  • Apricia jovialis Australian Jumping Spider

    07 Dec 2017-37.9,145.3Leuba Ridgway

    This attractive jumping spider was just a little over 5 mm long. The body was black with a banded yellow pattern on the abdomen. Legs were brown and pedipalps were covered with white hairs. Spotted on outer wall -suburban house.

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  • Caladenia alpina Mountain Hood-orchid

    18 Nov 2017-37.9,146.4Leuba Ridgway

    These beautiful orchids were about 25 cms tall. Flowers were on stout stems with pink tinges on the hood-forming central sepal. The other sepals and petals were spread out. The labellum had dark reddish spots and transverse bars. Leaves were fleshy and lanceolate (partially visible in photo). Spotted along the track in an alpine national park (Baw Baw NP)

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  • Oxyopes spp. Lynx Spider

    29 Nov 2017-37.9,145.3Leuba Ridgway

    This small lynx spider had a leg span of about 10 to 12 mm. Legs were pale, long and spikey. The body had black and white stripes through the length of it and what looked like a fuzz of fine red hairs around the cephalothorax making it look like an attractive two-toned spider at a glance. Palps were large and dark suggesting that it was male. Spotted in a suburban garden.

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    1. Chris Lindorff  Amazing legs.

      Reply • 04 Dec 2017

  • Endosimilis stilbealis

    29 Nov 2017-37.9,145.3Leuba Ridgway

    This is one of the most attractive of pyralids. It sat upright resting on its legs, hlding up a recurved abdomen. Wings ( span about 15 mm) were a beautiful and rich mix of deep red and orange. The fore wings were divided into three parts with the mid section showing a dark spot near the costa. Antennae were swept back. Attracted to bright lights in the house. My thanks to Cathy Powers for the ID.

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    1. Cathy Powers  Added.

      Reply • 30 Nov 2017

    2. Cathy Powers  Leuba - from my investigations, Persicoptera aglaopa has different markings on the hindwing than your image. It has yellow with a dark band at the outer margin of the hindwing. This appears to be more like Endosimilis stilbealis - perhaps gender specific.

      Reply • 30 Nov 2017

    3. Leuba Ridgway  Thank you Cathy. I believe you are right. I found a moth very similar in colour to mine on Barcodinglife.com and it was E.stilbealis.

      Reply • 03 Dec 2017

  • Unidentified

    16 Dec 2013-37.9,145.3Leuba Ridgway

    This large cossid moth had a wing span of at least 70 mm. There were no patterns on its grey wings however, the wings looked like sand-paper. The hind wings were shorter and a beautiful purplish brown. some of this colour was also seen in the abdominal segments nearer the thorax. Abdomen was very thick. antennae were short, feathery and brown. It was interesting to see this moth in flight - lifting its heavy body into the air after a short "taxiing". On ground, the moth could be heard fluttering from several metres away. Spotted under bright lights near a national park. Need help to ID this large cossid. thanks.

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  • Endoxyla secta

    30 Jan 2014-37.9,145.3Leuba Ridgway

    This Cossid moth would have had a wingspan of about 60 mm. Short black lines marked both fore wings. Broad white streaks near the costal margins made this moth stand out from the other grey cossids. Spotted under bright lights near a national park.

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  • Unidentified

    21 Jan 2013-37.9,145.3Leuba Ridgway

    A beautiful speckled grey and silver moth about 35mm long. Thorax had a distinct inverted "V" in black. Legs were heavily "furry" and antennae, feathery nearer the base. Hind wings were a pearly brown. Abdomen was quite thick. Again, spotted under bright lights near a national park with mixed natives.

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  • Unidentified

    21 Dec 2013-37.9,145.3Leuba Ridgway

    A Cossid moth about 40 mm long. Fore wings were a pale grey with a central darker area. Midway along the costa was a semicircular patch of white. A short diagonal patch of dark grey was seen along the trailing edge of the fore wings. The thorax had the inverted black "V" as in all most other cossids. Spotted under bright lights near native trees. One of many cossids spotted that year. According to Peter Marriott , this is near Trismelasmos donovani. My thanks to Peter M for the ID and to Cathy Powers for facilitating the identification.

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    1. Cathy Powers  Leuba - this is sp. near Trismelasmos donovani with the ID assistance by Peter Marriott.

      Reply • 30 Nov 2017

  • Endoxyla spp.

    28 Jan 2014-37.9,145.3Leuba Ridgway

    A fawn-coloured Cossid about 40 mm long, No distinct patterns on wings but darker along the veins. Antennae were brown and feathery. Thorax had a faint dark inverted "V" shape. Spotted under bright lights near a national park. I believe this is an Endoxyla moth. My thanks to peter Marriott for confirming the genus.

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    1. Cathy Powers  Leuba - Peter Marriott says it is an Endoxyla sp. with most of these with no name. Moths of Victoria volume 10 should assist but that is a work in progress.

      Reply • 30 Nov 2017

  • Endoxyla spp.

    11 Jan 2014-37.9,145.3Leuba Ridgway

    This gigantic and heavy moth was about 65 mm long and looked like a roll of burnt paper. The fore wings had attractive blotchy patches of black, brown, grey and white with the inner margins folding over each other in a wave. The grey thorax had two short black tufts of setae. Antennae were smooth and short. The abdomen was covered with dense grey setae; it looked and felt heavy. Spotted under bright lights near a national park.

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    1. Mark Ridgway  Maybe E lituratus ?

      Reply • 29 Nov 2017

    2. Cathy Powers  Probably best to list this as Endoxyla sp until further work is done on this group.

      Reply • 30 Nov 2017

  • Endoxyla spp.

    16 Jan 2014-37.9,145.3Leuba Ridgway

    This cossid moth was about 45 mm long. Mostly grey with tinges of light brown. The basal part of the fore wings had hatched markings of dark grey, the pattern running down to the apices of each wing. Hind wings were grey with the colour fading towards the sub marginal area. On each side of the thorax, running along the length of it was a broad band of dense white setae and just inside the band was a black line of setae ending posteriorly in a thick tuft. Antennae were feathery. Spotted under bright lights near national park.

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    Mark Ridgway starred this.

    1. Cathy Powers  Probably best for this to be Endoxyla sp until further ID assistance is acquired.

      Reply • 30 Nov 2017

  • Culama anthracica

    22 Jan 2014-37.9,145.3Leuba Ridgway

    This cossid moth was all grey with thin black lines across the wings like tiger-skin stripes, with the pattern changing slightly in the submarginal area. The thorax had dense grey and white setae. Antennae were feathery - male. Wing span about 50 mm. My thanks to Cathy Powers & Peter Marriott for the ID.

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    1. Mark Ridgway  Interesting to compare https://natureshare.org.au/observations/54e878fced2a89d990000624?display=thumbnails&order_by=created_at&user_id=Leuba

      Reply • 29 Nov 2017

    2. Cathy Powers  Leuba - this is Culama anthracica with the ID assistance of Peter Marriott.

      Reply • 30 Nov 2017

      • Leuba Ridgway  Thank you both Cathy Powers & Peter Marriott, for the ID. It's great I've got two species of Culama !

        Reply • 30 Nov 2017