Nyctophilus spp.

Long-eared Bat




2 items (100 per page)

  • Nyctophilus spp. Long-eared Bat

    12 May 2018-36.8,144.4Andrew Brown

    Small bat under our veranda. Slightly larger than a mouse in size.

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    1. Lawrie Conole  Very fuzzy picture which makes ID a little tricky. It's clearly a long-eared bat (Nyctophilus sp.), and although it's hard to tell from the photo it looks not to have a y-shaped noseleaf. That with it's warm brown colouration suggests that in your area it's most likely Gould's Long-eared Bat (Nyctophilus gouldi).

      Reply • 15 May

      • Andrew Brown  Thanks Lawrie. Yes, low light didn't help with the photo.

        Reply • 16 May

        • Lawrie Conole  I'd go with Nyctophilus sp. as I don't think it's definitively verifiable from the photo.

          Reply • 17 May

  • Nyctophilus spp. Long-eared Bat

    28 Mar 2017-37.8,144.3Cathy Powers

    I have no idea of which species but this bat was active in the area for about 15 minutes.

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    1. Chris Lindorff  From a number of the frames, you can clearly make out the long tail. This could indicate a freetail bat (Mormopterus spp.) Also seems to be a large microbat.

      Reply • 03 Apr 2017

    2. Lawrie Conole  From the fluttery flight, broad wings and large ears I'd suggest this is much more likely to be a long-eared bat (Nyctophilus sp). Little freetails are nowhere near as maneuverable as that and have much narrower wings - the tip of the tail would be free, but this one is fully enclosed in the tail membrane.

      Reply • 03 Apr 2017

    3. Lawrie Conole  Nyctophilus spp. species id suggested

      Reply • 03 Apr 2017

    4. Lawrie Conole  Not enough resolution to suggest whether N. geoffroyi or N. gouldi. Both are possible in or near the Brisbane Ranges.

      Reply • 03 Apr 2017

    5. Cathy Powers  Thank you Chris and Lawrie. Your comments certainly made me look closer at the video.

      Reply • 03 Apr 2017