27,022 items (page 5 of 901) (100 per page)

  • Trichoderma gelatinosum

    22 May 2014-38.6,143.8zeke1944

    5b7d4436ed2a89402b000096

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    1. zeke1944  Hypocrea gelatinosum. Grows on well rotted wood often underneath. Seen at Lake Elizabeth. Not on Data base.

      Reply • 22 Aug

    2. zeke1944  Featured in Gates p223

      Reply • 23 Aug

    3. Chris Lindorff  I can find reference to Hypocrea gelatinosa and Trichoderma gelatinosum (as synonyms). The ALA is currently accepting the latter name, referencing the NZ Organism Register. What information or advice do you have regarding current nomenclature? Thanks. Chris.

      Reply • 23 Aug

    4. zeke1944  ID by the fungi group from the reference in the guide book. Could also be under Creopus gelatinosus.

      Reply • 24 Aug

    5. John Walter  The accepted name is now Trichoderma gelatinosum. Many species of fungi have very different forms, depending on whether they were present in a sexual phase or an asexual phase. (Fungi seriously question our understanding of sex and even of species). In this instance the Telemorph, or sexual phase has been identified as Hypocrea, while the asexual phase or Anamorph is Trichoderma. Initially these phases were thought to be entirely different species but once it was understood that they were the same species it left a naming problem for the taxonomists. Initially precedence was given to the Telemorph but this did not work out so well with Hypocrea species as they can be extremely difficult to separate based on Telemorph features alone. A revised International Code of Nomenclature came into effect in June 2011 which required the adoption of one name only for these dualist species and Trichoderma predates the name Hypocrea by 31 years and has become the accepted name for the species formerly known as Hypocrea.

      Reply • 26 Aug

    6. Chris Lindorff  Thanks John. Trichoderma gelatinosum added to database (with Hypocrea gelatinosa listed as a synonym).

      Reply • 27 Aug

  • Unidentified

    22 Aug 2018Peter Clark

    5b7d1443ed2a891efe0000a9

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    1. Peter Clark  2 pix...on a introduced gum..

      Reply • 22 Aug

    2. zeke1944  Hypocrea gelatinosum. Not on the database (again) Found on well rotted wood often underneath. Seen at Lake Elizabeth

      Reply • 22 Aug

  • Unidentified

    20 Aug 2018Peter Clark

    5b7d13e2ed2a8928070000ad

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    1. Peter Clark  fungi..

      Reply • 22 Aug

  • Bolbitius vitellinus Egg-yolk Fieldcap

    20 Aug 2018Peter Clark

    5b7d111fed2a89402b000094

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    1. Peter Clark  2 pix...fungi..

      Reply • 22 Aug

    2. zeke1944  Bolbitius vitellinus species id suggested

      Reply • 22 Aug

  • Bolbitius vitellinus Egg-yolk Fieldcap

    20 Aug 2018Peter Clark

    5b7d0f89ed2a891efe0000a8

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    1. Peter Clark  3 pix...fungi....are they the same?

      Reply • 22 Aug

    2. zeke1944  Bolbitius vitellinus species id suggested

      Reply • 22 Aug

  • Ocyphaps lophotes Crested Pigeon

    20 Aug 2018Peter Clark

    5b7d0e00ed2a89402b000093

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    1. Peter Clark  2 pix... dove...

      Reply • 22 Aug

    2. Chris Lindorff  Ocyphaps lophotes species id suggested

      Reply • 22 Aug

  • Unidentified

    21 Aug 2018Peter Clark

    5b7d0cfeed2a8928070000aa

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    1. Peter Clark  2 pix...caterpillar.....on all things a serrated tussock.

      Reply • 22 Aug

  • Flaviporus brownii

    15 Jun 2015-38.6,143.6zeke1944

    5b7cfe72ed2a89c6aa000097

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    1. zeke1944  Flaviporus brownii. A bright polypore. No clues from the data base.

      Reply • 22 Aug

    2. Cathy Powers  Flaviporus brownii added to dataset.

      Reply • 23 Aug

    3. John Walter  There is only one collection of this species listed for Australia on the Virtual Herbarium, although there are several for New Zealand. There have been a number of recent observations recently and I suspect the FNCV group has made more collections that have not yet been listed. Records overseas are for tropical Central and South America. The bright colour aids identification.

      Reply • 27 Aug

    4. zeke1944  Seen several times in the Powelltown/Noojee area can cover large areas on fallen logs. Seen once in the Otways.

      Reply • 27 Aug

  • Entoloma moongum

    04 Jul 2012-38.5,144.0zeke1944

    5b7cfb62ed2a89c6aa000096

  • Entolomataceae spp.

    01 Jun 2016-38.5,143.9zeke1944

    5b7cf943ed2a8928070000a9

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    1. zeke1944  This may be another fan shaped Entoloma the Mycelium is similar to that of E piterika and the cap has purplish hues and the spore seems to be pinkish. I know there is at least one more fan shaped species in the Entoloma genus I just don't know anything about it.

      Reply • 23 Aug

    2. John Walter  I guess you are referring to E. byssisedum which has been collected twice in Perth (once near pines) and in rainforest at the Bunya Mountains in Qld, plus there are two collections from the North Island in NZ one of which was from Nothofagus forest. This European species is the type species for the group E. pitereka is linked too. I have not spent long chasing images for it but it could be a possibility although it is more olive or brown toned rather than purplish and the basal mycelium seems to be more cobwebby.

      Reply • 26 Aug

    3. John Walter  I have also been looking closely at another fan shaped Clitopilus, C. conchatus. Gates & Ratkowsky does not provide a lot of data but Noordeloos & Gates has better detail. Some of your group appear too large for this species as it is listed as 5-6 mm diameter and the gills on this one are thicker than what I can see on yours. It does have "white, cottony rhizomorphs" like yours and the cap colour is described as "white, tomentose with a soft jelly-like greyish context revealed upon the collapse of the ... tomentum with handling". I do not this it is your species but I think we could record yours as Entolomataceae spp.

      Reply • 26 Aug

    4. Chris Lindorff  Entoloma pitereka has been added to database.

      Reply • 27 Aug

  • Entoloma spp.

    25 May 2015-38.5,143.7zeke1944

    5b7cf6c2ed2a8928070000a8

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    1. zeke1944  Entoloma haastii. About 4cm diam. Found in a bare rocky site near Forest.

      Reply • 22 Aug

    2. zeke1944   Also featured in Fuhrer (87) as Entoloma sp.

      Reply • 22 Aug

    3. John Walter  In ALA, could Entoloma haastii be added to the dataset please

      Reply • 26 Aug

    4. Chris Lindorff  Entoloma haastii added to database.

      Reply • 27 Aug

  • Entoloma spp.

    22 Aug 2018-38.5,143.7zeke1944

    5b7cf65fed2a89402b000092

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    1. zeke1944  Entoloma porphyrescens. Gates p75

      Reply • 22 Aug

    2. John Walter  This species in on ALA, could Entoloma porphyrescens be added to the dataset please

      Reply • 26 Aug

    3. Chris Lindorff  Entoloma porphyrescens added to database.

      Reply • 27 Aug

  • Entoloma albidosimulans

    25 May 2015-38.6,143.8zeke1944

    5b7bfd43ed2a891efe0000a4

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    1. zeke1944  Entoloma albidosimulans. Gates p64. Often on trunks of Dicksonia antartica.

      Reply • 21 Aug

    2. John Walter  There are two all white collybioid Entolomas currently described for Tasmania (Plus 3 that are tricholomatoid in shape). They are E. albidosimulans and E. totialbum. They are readily separated microscopically however I assume we only have this image to work on. E. albidosimulans has a cap that has a "deflexed then straight margin" and is "finely tomentose all over, becoming radially fibrillose with age" and undergoes a colour change when older to "pale ochre yellow to pink". The E. totialbum cap has a "straight, entire margin" and is "white becoming pink-tinged, glabrous, dry, slightly aeriferous".

      Reply • 22 Aug

    3. John Walter  The pink on the lower cap is spores deposited from above but there does appear to be a hint of yellowing at its left apex. It is difficult to determine if it has a finely tomentose surface. There is no hint of decurved margins in your image, even the small specimen in the inset appears to have straight margins and Gates images of E. albidosimulans this size clearly show an in-rolled margin. The gills of E. albidosimulans are described as "moderately distant" whereas on E. totialbum they are "crowded", and also described as having a serrulate edge. If you look closely at the gills in your post between 11 o clock and midday, you can see minute teeth or serrulations.

      Reply • 22 Aug

    4. John Walter  I am tending towards E. totialbum, largely on the serrulate gills, however even there, there is contradictory detail. E. albidosimulans can often have gills that are "distinctly emarginate with a distinct decurrent tooth" but they are otherwise adnate. The description for E. totialbum lists the gills as "adnate with decurrent tooth". The sharp dip in the gills as they approach the stipe is defined as emarginate and is apparent on this sample. Unfortunately there have been very few collections of E. totialbum so it is possible it might also show this feature. This could very easily be either species. One feature of E. totialbum that might help separate these is that it's stipe is slightly yellowing at the base. If you have other images of this group that show the base of the stipe it might help. I was introduced to E. albidosimulans by Genevieve Gates in the Tarkine a few years back, those specimens were older and rain affected but they were located on the trunk of Dicksonia antarctica. The text I have does not describe the substrates for either species unfortunately.

      Reply • 22 Aug

    5. John Walter  I just noted on the description for E. albidosimulans that the gill edges can be "slightly fimbriate" meaning lightly toothed. This now puts the weight of evidence back towards E. albidosimulans.

      Reply • 22 Aug

    6. zeke1944  There you go.

      Reply • 22 Aug

    7. Cathy Powers  Entoloma albidosimulans added to dataset.

      Reply • 23 Aug

  • Camarophyllopsis spp.

    18 Jul 2012-38.5,143.9zeke1944

    5b7ba3f5ed2a891efe0000a3

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    1. zeke1944  Camarophyllopsis spp. species id suggested

      Reply • 21 Aug

    2. zeke1944  Originally Id as Hygrotrama sp. This now appears now to be with Camerophyllopsis and may be featured in Gates p37 as C brown. Also seen in the Wombat Forest. Seems to like bare soil.

      Reply • 21 Aug

  • Mycena spp.

    05 Jun 2014-38.5,143.9zeke1944

    5b7ba170ed2a89c6aa000095

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    1. zeke1944  Mycena aff mamuka. Formerly known as Marasmius cylindraceocampanulatus. found on stem material that belongs to Dicksonia antartica. Close to the NZ species M mamuka which has a different gill formation.

      Reply • 21 Aug

    2. John Walter  Could this species be added in the same way we have done other such as Xylaria "Spikey". e.g. Mycena sp. nov. sensu Gates & Ratkowsky(1) 2016 / aff Mycena mamaku I have also found this species in the Otways on Wild Dog Rd and also on tree fern, unfortunately I had focus issues with the camera but you can see the gills are sometimes decurrent.

      Reply • 26 Aug

  • Humidicutis arcohastata

    13 May 2011-38.6,143.8zeke1944

    5b7b9cc1ed2a891efe0000a2

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    1. zeke1944  Humidicutis arcohastata. This name may have been superceded again. Seen at Lake Elizabeth. Prone to color changes.

      Reply • 21 Aug

    2. Cathy Powers  Humidicutis arcohastata added to dataset.

      Reply • 24 Aug

  • Aleurodiscus spp.

    15 Apr 2012-38.5,143.9zeke1944

    5b7b9744ed2a89c6aa000093

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    Cathy Powers starred this.

    1. zeke1944  Aleurodiscus spp. species id suggested

      Reply • 21 Aug

    2. zeke1944   Featured in Fuhrer 428. Found on dead Bracken fronds (Pteridium asculentum) in wetter forests. Seen only once.

      Reply • 21 Aug

  • Uromycladium tepperianum

    31 Jan 2017-38.1,145.2Jeff Triplett

    Gall caused by a rust fungus, about 10cm across, on a large Acacia Mearnsii. Update: Uromycladium tepperianum has been split into at least 16 different species each infecting a different range of Acacia species. The one on Acacia mearnsii is called Uromycladium murphyi. See "Diversity of gall-forming rusts (Uromycladium, Pucciniales) on Acacia in Australia" by C. Doungsa-ard et al, Persoonia vol. 40, 2018 pages 221–238.

    5b7b8c85ed2a89402b000090

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    1. David Francis  Hi Jeff, great to have you keeping ahead of the game! Split into 16 species - that's a lot! We usually wait until the new names appear in the ALA before updating. The ALA names are sourced from Ausfungi (MEL)

      Reply • 12 Sep

  • Cordyceps spp.

    27 Mar 2016-38.5,143.9zeke1944

    5b7ab610ed2a891efe0000a1

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    1. zeke1944  his species is listed as Cordyceps taylorii in gates p219. However this species is also described as large to 30cm and not unlike C robertsii. Some dispute here. Specimen here 2 to 3 cm.

      Reply • 21 Aug

    2. John Walter  Agree, some dispute here. The Willis paper on Cordyceps from Muelleria does not provide any answers however they has long been uncertainty around C. taylorii.

      Reply • 26 Aug

  • Parasola plicatilis Pleated Inkcap

    12 Jul 2018-38.3,144.7Bernie Lingham

    Single specimen <5cm, growing in sandy soil and damp moss. Area was quite moist after a couple of days of consistent rain. Caladenia sp. leaf (possibly C. parva) on the left in the image.

    5b7a5bc4ed2a89c6aa000092

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    1. Lorraine Phelan  Lovely. I've just edited mine as Parasola plicatilis which I think is a synonym of Coprinus plicatilis.

      Reply • 20 Aug

    2. Bernie Lingham  Noted thanks Lorraine. You'll see I've edited this observation to the same species.

      Reply • 20 Aug

    3. zeke1944  Careful this image could be Parasola virgulicolens a species which is often found as a single specimen in dryer areas and has a grainy cap. P plicatilis tend to be whitish and a bit shiny.

      Reply • 20 Aug

    4. John Walter  Great image. Sorry, I am caught up with other work for a few days but I suggest you download the Perth Field Book - www.wanaturalists.org.au/files/2011/11/FieldBook_2017-Edn-final.pdf - This has a number of Coprinus species not covered in the average guide book and will provide some insight. I do not think this is Parasola, but the slightly hairy stipe and veil remains on the cap should help with ID. The UK has around 65 species of Inkcap whereas our guidebooks have listed only half a dozen or so. I will look at these posts properly when I get time later in the week.

      Reply • 20 Aug

    5. Bernie Lingham  Thank you John and Zeke. Much appreciated. I've downloaded the ebook and will investigate further.

      Reply • 21 Aug

  • Isaria spp.

    22 Jun 2012-38.3,144.1zeke1944

    5b7a41feed2a8928070000a7

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    1. zeke1944  Isaria sp. This name was given to us by the Her barium, Seen several times in the Anglesea area

      Reply • 20 Aug

    2. Cathy Powers  Isaria spp. added to dataset.

      Reply • 21 Aug

    3. John Walter  The Isaria are related to the Cordyceps

      Reply • 26 Aug

  • Cordyceps spp.

    27 Jul 2018-38.5,143.9zeke1944

    5b7a3feded2a8928070000a6

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    1. zeke1944  Larger specimen found in the Pennyroyal area. May belong to C gunnii but have never seen this shape and size in that species.

      Reply • 20 Aug

  • Cordyceps spp.

    03 Sep 2017-38.5,143.9zeke1944

    5b7a3d91ed2a8928070000a5

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    John Walter starred this.

    1. zeke1944  Smaller than any known species and a different color.

      Reply • 20 Aug

    2. John Walter  It is not dissimilar to C. hawksii and the host seems smaller than usual for that species (see my image in the Otway group). Perhaps a smaller host has produced a scaled down fruiting body however the transition between the fertile section of the club and the base, is not abrupt like you expect for C. hawksii. A very interesting find.

      Reply • 26 Aug

  • Phaeoclavulina abietina

    11 Jul 2012-38.4,144.3zeke1944

    5b7a361fed2a89c6aa000091

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    Bernie Lingham starred this.

    1. zeke1944  Ramaria abietina. Rare is Australia. Only found in 2 sites in Victoria.

      Reply • 20 Aug

    2. Cathy Powers  Phaeoclavulina abietina added to dataset. Ramaria abietina is a synonym.

      Reply • 21 Aug

  • Parasola plicatilis Pleated Inkcap

    16 Aug 2018-38.3,144.2Lorraine Phelan

    Tiny. Growing next to, or possibly on, dung.

    5b7971eced2a89c6aa000090

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    Lawrie Conole starred this.

    1. zeke1944  Coprinus spp. species id suggested

      Reply • 20 Aug

    2. zeke1944  I know this species as Coprinus plicatilis.

      Reply • 20 Aug

    3. Bernie Lingham  Lorraine, I found a similar fungus at Sorrento back in July. At the time I had a ? about the ID but wondered if it might be Coprinus plicatilis (based on info in the FNCV fungi booklets). I'll post my photo shortly.

      Reply • 20 Aug

    4. Lorraine Phelan  Thankyou Bernie and Zeke for your help. I'll edit the heading.

      Reply • 20 Aug

    5. Lorraine Phelan  Could the admins add this species to the database please.

      Reply • 20 Aug

    6. Lorraine Phelan  Is it syn. Parasola plicatilis?

      Reply • 20 Aug

    7. John Walter  Sorry, I am caught up with other work for a few days but I suggest you download the Perth Field Book - www.wanaturalists.org.au/files/2011/11/FieldBook_2017-Edn-final.pdf - This has a number of Coprinus species not covered in the average guide book and will provide some insight. I do not think this is Parasola.

      Reply • 20 Aug

    8. John Walter  The dung looks non native and there is a small granular button on the dung to the right in the background plus there are granules of veil remains on the cap. All indicate this is not Parasola plicatilis as it is not a dung species and does not carry veil remains. There are a couple of interesting possibilities in the European/English texts which I will explore further on the weekend.

      Reply • 21 Aug

      • Lorraine Phelan  Thanks John. Unfortunately I only noticed the button on the computer screen so I don't have another photo of it.

        Reply • 22 Aug

  • Coltricia cinnamomea

    16 Aug 2018-38.3,144.2Lorraine Phelan

    Two images. Coltricia sp.?

    5b797121ed2a89c6aa00008f

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    Bernie Lingham starred this.

    1. John Walter  Yes, Coltricia cinnamomea in the older texts and now listed as Coltricia australica in Gates & Ratkowsky. ALA has not yet adopted the new name and when reviewing the paper I note it is based on one specimen collected in Tasmania which was separated from C. cinnamomea on spore size and DNA analysis. The researcher then compared to the DNA to one specimen held in the Melbourne Herbarium which suggested the two were closely related. Both these specimens were phylogenetically well segregated from other Coltricia species. I am not sure Tom May would consider two specimens a significant enough sample on which to adopt a full reclassification of Australian material and I would leave the name as C. cinnamomea for now.

      Reply • 20 Aug

  • Entoloma tomentosolilacinum

    15 May 2014-38.6,143.9zeke1944

    5b7965c8ed2a8928070000a4

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    1. zeke1944  Entoloma tomentosolilacium take 2

      Reply • 19 Aug

    2. John Walter  This set is closer to what I was expecting to see and the lower left image shows the silky fibrillose stipe and white basal tomentum. Gates gives the cap size as 5 - 15 diameter and the cap is described as lilac-grey to greyish ruby. The stipes look very dark in the upper image. One thing I have noticed after working through the images in The Entolomataceae of Tasmania, is that there is a lot of variation in colour with many species. The combination of the tomentose cap, fibrillose stipe, located on wood etc. all points to E. tomentosolilacinum. Could Entoloma tomentosolilacinum be added to the dataset please.

      Reply • 19 Aug

    3. Cathy Powers  Entoloma tomentosolilacinum added to dataset.

      Reply • 21 Aug

  • Entoloma uliginicola

    18 May 2017-38.7,143.4John Walter

    Four images. A more intense colour form than the earlier post.

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  • Clitopilus spp.

    30 Apr 2014-38.6,143.9zeke1944

    5b78bb34ed2a891efe00009e

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    1. John Walter  Could Clitopilus pseudopiperitus please be added to the dataset, this species is listed on ALA under its synonym Rhodocybe pseudopiperita. (correct spelling is ~piperitus)

      Reply • 19 Aug

    2. zeke1944  Clitopilus pseudopiperitus gates p4

      Reply • 22 Aug

  • Entoloma pitereka

    17 Jun 2017-38.5,144.1zeke1944

    5b78b958ed2a89402b00008c

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    1. zeke1944  Entoloma pitereka. Found at Moggs Crekk. Has a distinctive rhizomorph.

      Reply • 19 Aug

    2. John Walter  The white rhizomorphs spreading across the wood are characteristic of the species and readily separate this from the similar looking, and also pink-spored, Clitopilus hobsonii. Could Entoloma pitereka be added to the dataset.

      Reply • 19 Aug