10 items (100 per page)

  • Doratifera oxleyi Painted Cup Moth

    22 Mar 2018-37.8,148.5Mark Ridgway

    Several attracted to lights in camping ground at night. There seemed to be far more females than males around the lights but in the forest in daytime we found far more males than females.

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  • Asthenoptycha spp.

    22 Mar 2018-37.8,144.3Cathy Powers

    Such an under-studied group of moths, it may be a while before this can be identified to species level.

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  • Doratifera oxleyi Painted Cup Moth

    22 Mar 2018-37.8,144.3Cathy Powers

    Males are about a third of the size of the female. Only one male and about 20 females to the light-trap this evening.

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  • Cephaloscyllium laticeps Draughtboard Shark Swellshark

    22 Mar 2018-37.8,148.7Mark Ridgway

    Found at low tide in a rocky channel this egg-case was well attached by the tendril at one end to something below a covering of sand. Also known as Swellshark or Draughtboard shark. The case was about 250mm long, squared at one end and tapered to a point at the other. Each end had two long, curly tendrils. The shark is a benthic zone species native to Australian waters. A very similar and related species is found in New Zealand.

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    Cathy Powers and Mark Ridgway starred this.

    1. Lorraine Phelan  Is it an egg case?

      Reply • 29 Mar

    2. David Francis  Cephaloscyllium laticeps added to database. Nice to see marine species.

      Reply • 29 Mar

  • Meridiastra calcar Carpet Sea Star Eight-armed Cushion Star

    22 Mar 2018-37.8,148.7Leuba Ridgway

    An eight-armed carpet sea star with greenish grey colouring. The arms showed some red along the margins. The body pattern included small white scalloping and the central disc was a beautiful green. The arms were well defined ending in thick rounded tips. This sea star was about 50 mm across. Spotted in a rock pool - intertidal rocky shore (Cape Conran) facing the Bass Strait. They occur all around the Australian coast.

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    Cathy Powers and Mark Ridgway starred this.

  • Galeolaria caespitosa Intertidal Tubeworm

    22 Mar 2018-37.8,148.7Leuba Ridgway

    This mass resembling worn coral was about 10 cms across. On the surface were crescent shaped structures which were the open ends of calcareous tubes constructed by tubeworms. They have clustered together and probably grown on a snail, completely enveloping it and forming a hard mass, as suggested by Audrey Falconer(Marine Research). The mass was partially covered with sand but red algae could be seen growing on the mass. The tubes are built by annelid fanworms from the family Serpulidae. The worms have branchial crowns in two lobes, one of them has a stalked operculum (lid). The branchial croown form the gills and also helps to capture food. The worm lives within the tube and retracts into the tube when in danger or when the tide is out, pulling the operculum down tight to shut the opening of the tube. A dense mass of tubes can form a microhabitat for other marine creatures. My thanks to Audrey Falconer ( Marine Research) for identifying this mass. Spotted in a rock pool in an intertidal zone of a rocky shoreline ( Cape Conran, Victoria). These tubeworms are seen from Southern Queensland all along the southern coast to Western Australia.

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    1. David Francis  Galeolaria caespitosa added to db. Location doesn't completely rule out the morphologically identical Galeolaria gemineoa, separated by DNA studies. See http://portphillipmarinelife.net.au/species/11175

      Reply • 30 Mar

      • Leuba Ridgway  Thank you for adding the ID to the database David and your message. Prior to posting here I sought help from the Marine Research Group of The Field Naturalists Club of Victoria. Audrey Falconer (an expert on Marine Invertebrates) provided me the ID. Also given the location where it was found, I believe the species to be correct. I also checked the Port Phillip marine life web site as it's very useful.

        Reply • 30 Mar

  • Sypharochiton pelliserpentis Snakeskin Chiton

    22 Mar 2018-37.8,148.7Leuba Ridgway

    A mollusc with a flattened body and eight distinctive overlapping plates that protect them from predators and crashing waves. This chiton was grey-green in colour, about 63 mm x 35 mm. The girdle encircling the plates had a snake-skin like appearance giving it the common name "snakeskin chiton". These chitons were found along with barnacles, attached to the side of a rock in an intertidal rocky shore (Cape Conran) off the south coast of Victoria facing the Bass Strait. This species is said to prefer rock surfaces in the mid-tide region, rather than under rocks in lower -or sub-tidal zones.

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    Chris Lindorff, Cathy Powers, David Francis and 1 others starred this.

    1. David Francis  Sypharochiton pelliserpentis added to the db.

      Reply • 30 Mar

    2. David Francis  Barnacle family, Synagogidae also added.

      Reply • 30 Mar

  • Aulactinia veratra Common Green Anemone

    22 Mar 2018-37.8,148.7Leuba Ridgway

    The anemone was about 50 mm with tentacles extended and floating in the water. Tentacles were numerous, translucent but dark green in colour and had pointy ends. The oral disc was covered by sand and therefore not visible. Where the anemones were out of water, they looked like dark clumps studded with sand grains. Partially submerged anemones (pic 3) were interesting in that the submerged part had extended tentacles and the exposed part was curled up displaying a sand encrusted column. Long striations could be seen in the retracted column which was the same colour as the tentacles. Spotted in rock pools - rocky intertidal zone (Cape Conran)

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    1. David Francis  Name added to db https://natureshare.org.au/species/aulactinia_veratra (new name).

      Reply • 04 Apr

    2. Leuba Ridgway  Thank you David.

      Reply • 04 Apr

  • Brachidontes rostratus Beaked Mussel

    22 Mar 2018-37.8,148.7Leuba Ridgway

    These mussels were about 40 mm long. The purple shells had black rims with thin curved lines. They were seen in clusters and were of varying sizes. Spotted on exposed rocks - rocky shoreline in the intertidal area ( Cape Conran, Victoria)

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    1. David Francis  Brachidontes rostratus added.

      Reply • 30 Mar

  • Unidentified

    22 Mar 2018Peter Clark

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    1. Peter Clark  2 pix..poor....pretty high...

      Reply • 24 Mar

    2. Andrew Allen  Very hard to ID from this, but maybe a Peregrine Falcon or an Australian Hobby?

      Reply • 25 Mar

    3. Peter Clark  dont think it's a peregrine..didnt hear it,have heard peregrines before...there were 2 small raptors sky larking down on the escarpment last week,creamy whitish..never heard them before.

      Reply • 25 Mar

    4. Lawrie Conole  Where was this taken? It's neither a Peregrine nor a Hobby. Probably a Brown Falcon, but very hard to tell from the faraway image!

      Reply • 26 Mar